By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners may set cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising.

  • Mother and daughter rescued after creating 'help' sign from giant ferns share survival story

    A US exchange student and her mother were rescued after a helicopter pilot spotted the large “help” signs they had made from ferns. The two were lost for five days in the New Zealand wilderness after attempting a day-long hike. Rachel Lloyd, 22, is now recovering in hospital in Wellington with her mother, Carolyn Lloyd, by her side. The pair set out on April 26 with a backpack filled with water, trail mix and snacks for a hike in Tararua Forest Park, but the day out went wrong when trail markers they were following seemed to stop. They had followed orange route markers to a summit but encountered problems on the way down. “It got very steep, very jungly,” said Rachel. “The markers completely

    Irish Examiner q
  • Watch the timelapse of a Boeing 767 being prepared to be shipped from Shannon Airport to Sligo

    Funeral director David McGowan has gripped the nation in recent weeks with his plan to move a Boeing 767 from Shannon Airport to Sligo as part of his Quirky Nights Glamping Village. With the plane purchased and resting at Shannon, McGowan had obvious difficulties in transporting the Boeing (which is 159-feet long, weighs about 70 tonnes and has a 140-foot wing span) back to Sligo. After ruling out transportation by blimp and helicopter, McGowan got around the problem by moving the plane by barge. Videographer Jack O'Shea has captured some of the action on camera and sent it to us at irishexaminer.com. The timelapse shows the plane being prepared to travel from Shannon Airport to Knockbeg Point

    Irish Examiner q
  • Mother who lost five family members in the Buncrana Pier tragedy completes Belfast Marathon

    A mother who lost five members of her family when their car plunged off a pier has run a marathon in memory of her son just weeks after the tragedy. Louise James paid an emotional tribute to more than 100 runners – including a hero who saved her baby daughter from drowning in the accident – who joined her in the race. Crossing the line at the Belfast Marathon, she said her eight-year-old son Evan would have been proud of them all. “I want to thank every single person who took part to remember Evan, whether you ran the race or have put your hand in your pocket to donate,” she said. “You did something remarkable in his name and to celebrate his life. I know he would be proud.” Louise’s partner

    Irish Examiner q
  • Birthday girl Princess Charlotte is jewel in the crown

    New photographs of Princess Charlotte, taken by her mother, the Duchess of Cambridge, at their home in Norfolk, have been released to mark her first birthday, today. The four new pictures show how the princess has grown. In one of the photos,Charlotte is in a pink cardigan with a white collar, worn over a soft-pink floral dress — a pink clip in her hair — pushing a colourful baby walker, which is full of alphabet blocks, on the lawn outside.  She has a determined look on her face. In another, dressed in the same outfit, she sits on the floor at home, gazing at the camera with big, blue eyes similar to those of her older brother, Prince George.  A third photograph portrays her leaning on a wooden

    Irish Examiner q
  • Gougane Barra has Ireland’s top toilet

    It’s more famous for its magnificent scenery, but Gougane Barra can now lay claim to being the best place in the country to answer nature’s call, after it was voted home to one of the world’s top 100 toilets. Travel bible Lonely Planet has singled out the thatched restroom, nestled in the stunning 1,000-acre Co Cork forest park, as one of the planet’s most “stunning lavatories”. Its new publication, Toilets: A Spotter’s Guide, highlights the most memorable outdoor public lavatories in the world, including a remote toilet island in Belize, a waterfall washroom in Taiwan, and an Arctic outhouse in Lapland. In its description of Gougane Barra’s eye-catching restroom — the only Irish loo which makes the coveted list — Lonely Planet’s writers said: “Gougane Barra in Co Cork, Ireland, has been a retreat from the cruel world and a spot for quiet contemplation — since St Finbarr established an island monastery on the lake during the sixth century.

    Irish Examiner q
  • What is the reality of the threat posed by Islamic extremists in Ireland?

    The public’s knowledge of the threat posed by Islamic extremists in Ireland is as limited as the amount of information provided to it by the authorities. As part of ongoing reports on this area, Cormac O’Keeffe was given a rare in-depth interview with the head of the Garda’s security services, Assistant Commissioner John O’Mahoney, about the reality of the situation here and what is being done about it.  Also present was Sergeant Dave McInerney, who, as the head of the Garda’s Racial, Intercultural, and Diversity Office, has a key role in developing an accurate understanding of, and good relationship with, the Irish Muslim community BAR the bizarre ‘Jihad Jane’ plot in 2010, the issue of Islamic

    Irish Examiner q
  • TERRACE TALK: Liverpool - Too many players know time is up

    It’s been one of those weeks when perspective is put to the test. Of course legal validation for the Hillsborough families was the main thing; virtually everything else dwindles when put alongside that. Football has a tendency to put on its finery and step up on such occasions.  Newcastle, Everton and Swansea were especially good, but as the bereaved began to think about financial compensation and continue the pursuit of real justice, particularly against South Yorkshire Police, you could detect the first murmurs of “seriously? You still won’t let it go?” Twenty-seven years it took just to get this far. There are actually people who think all of that agony can be boxed up with a neat ribbon and

    Irish Examiner q
  • Five Easy Steps to a Crankin' Car Stereo

    1) Enter your vehicle info 2) See what fits 3) Place your order 4) It ships free and arrives fast. 5) Install your gear and enjoy your drive time.

  • Cheaper electricity is coming at a huge cost to the climate

    Green party leader Eamon Ryan is is an even-tempered kind of guy, but make the economic argument for keeping Ireland’s only coal-fired power plant going and watch him get hot under the collar. “It is scandalous to be putting short-term profit ahead of moral obligation,” he thunders. “Moneypoint and the peat-fired stations are massive contributors to our greenhouse-gas emissions.” Last year, Ireland’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions rose by 5.5% in the industrial sector. Why? Moneypoint. The plant increased its electricity-generation significantly. Moneypoint, Co Clare, is the biggest contributor to GHG in Ireland. EPA director general Laura Burke has warned that using it more — which we are bound

    Irish Examiner q
  • Helicopter had returned to base twice before crash

    A helicopter that crashed in Norway killing 13 people had to return to base twice in the days before the tragedy after a warning light was triggered. Helicopter operator CHC confirmed that the Super Puma had to turn back to Flesland Airport in Bergen last Tuesday when the pilot spotted the indication light. After a part was replaced, a test flight the following day was also aborted and another component changed when the light reappeared. The company said the aircraft completed six commercial flights with no indications of problems on Thursday, the day before the fatal accident. The helicopter was carrying two crew and 11 passengers from the North Sea Gullfaks B oil field, around 120km off the

    Irish Examiner q
  • Shamefully, sexism in sport is alive and well

    Not a good week for fully developed human beings interested in sport? Depressing exhibition A: the devastating YouTube video posted by sports journalists Sarah Spain and Julie DiCaro, in which they get random men to read out some of the messages they get from men. Vile messages, that is. A random selection? ‘I hope you get raped again’. ‘I hope a hockey player beats you to death’. ‘I hope your boyfriend beats you’. Not that random, admittedly. Some of the tweets that were read out don’t have any place in a family newspaper that gets passed around the table at breakfast time, though clearly some people feel they have a rightful place anywhere a person with a smartphone or internet access can read

    Irish Examiner q
  • UK Remain campaign can learn from Ireland’s EU referenda

    With Brexit vote on European Union status just weeks away, the apathy of the young may be key, say Mary C Murphy and John O’Brennan WITH seven weeks to go to the Brexit polling day, in the UK, much can be learned from Ireland’s frequent referendums on EU treaties. Even the undoubted star power of US President Barack Obama has done little to quell the impression that the UK’s Remain campaign is floundering. With the Brexit outcome uncertain, Ireland provides important lessons, which the Remain side would do well to absorb. This will be the first referendum on the European Union held in the UK since 1975. Ireland has held nine EU-related referendums since 1972. The more recent of these have been

    Irish Examiner q
  • Warren Buffett advises 40,000 people of stock picks at 'Woodstock for Capitalists'

    Billionaire Warren Buffett said on Saturday that Berkshire Hathaway is poised to do well no matter who wins the White House in November, and the billionaire investor defended the performance and tactics of the conglomerate’s several large investments. Mr Buffett presided over his 51st Berkshire annual meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, where he and vice chairman Charlie Munger fielded five hours of questions on such matters as Coca-Cola’s sugary drinks, lower shipping volumes on the BNSF railroad, risks from derivatives, and who might succeed Mr Buffett as chief executive. Berkshire owns close to 90 businesses in energy, insurance, manufacturing, railroad, retail and other sectors, and invests well over $100bn (€87bn) in stocks. Mr Buffett, a staunch supporter of Democrat Hillary Clinton for president, was asked about the regulatory impact on Berkshire if Republican frontrunner Donald Trump wins the 2016 US presidential election.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Teacher misconduct inquiries to get underway

    Long-awaited hearings into complaints about serious misconduct and underperformance by teachers look set to take place later this year. The last remaining legal obstacle in the way of hearings taking place was removed last Friday when Minister for Education Jan O’Sullivan commenced new vetting requirements for teachers. Under the new legislation, the Teaching Council will have the power to remove a teacher from its register where it deems the person unfit to teach, including where this is for child-protection reasons. The council will also be charged with investigating underperformance or conduct issues on foot of complaints from students, parents and teachers, among others. Suspended Only issues

    The Irish Times q
  • Maurice Shanahan heckled before firing crucial free, says Dan

    Dan Shanahan has claimed his brother Maurice was jeered by the Clare bench as he took his last-gasp free to force a replay. The Waterford selector’s younger sibling succeeded in converting the placed ball from close to the Kinane Stand sideline but it wasn’t without intimidation, he claimed. “Again, I think Maurice deserves respect; it took a lot of liathróidí to put the ball over the bar. A lot of heckles. He got a lot of heckling now, to be honest with you. “I’m talking from the Clare bench now, lads. From the crowd and stuff like that. That’s just the way it is, I suppose. That’s sport.” When asked to confirm it came from the direction of the Clare area of the sideline, Shanahan said: “I’ll

    Irish Examiner q
  • Fans defend Justin Bieber after 'animal cruelty' backlash over picture with tied-up tiger

    Justin Bieber has come under fire from animal charities after posing with a tiger at his father’s engagement party. Peta US (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) warned the Sorry singer was “lucky not to have had his throat torn out” after sharing an Instagram snap of him stroking an adult tiger which was tied-up on a leash. The singer was at a bash thrown for his dad Jeremy and girlfriend Chelsey Rebelo at an estate in Toronto where the hosts had brought in the tiger for entertainment. And Peta was quick to slam the star for the “cruel and dangerous photo-op”, and sent him a letter asking him not to pose with wild animals again. Peta US senior vice-president Lisa Lange warned: “Justin

    Irish Examiner q
  • Kenny and Co still have senior hurling games to play

    It is never easy, is it? writes Daniel McConnell If Enda Kenny thought that doing the deal with Fianna Fáil was the hard part, and squaring off the Independents was a breeze, then yesterday gave him cause to think again. With Labour, Fianna Fáil, the Social Democrats, the Greens, Sinn Féin, the Anti-Austerity Alliance/People Before Profit group, and some Independents all not willing to touch him with a barge poll, Kenny’s options for government partners are limited. Yes, he has Independents Michael Lowry and Katherine Zappone in the bag but, so far, he has nobody else. Zappone looks set to become a Cabinet minister, given her decision to break ranks and support Kenny’s bid to be re-elected. Three

    Irish Examiner q
  • New York miss fairytale as Roscommon dodge Bronx nightmare

    New York 0-17 Roscommon 1-15 The wait for a fairytale goes on. But oh how close New York came to making history in the Bronx last night. Under leaden skies they frightened the life out of Roscommon, refusing to wilt against massively favoured opponents. In the end, on the coldest Connacht opener in New York memories, they fell by the narrowest possible margin, an agonising solitary point. With Luke Loughlin and Brian Connor dominant after the break, it was a stretch of four straight points after the hour mark had Roscommon on the ropes. A score from substitute Senan Kilbride as the clock ticked over turned out to be decisive. But for Roscommon’s management team, lauded for a hugely impressive

    The Irish Times q
  • Parents criticise Cork City Hall over playground U-turn

    Parents fighting for a public playground which has been stalled for almost a decade have criticised Cork City Hall for doing a U-turn on their fundraising offer. Last year, city officials turned down the fundraising offer from parents in Bishopstown to secure the playground, plans for which were first drawn up in 2008. They were told fundraising was not necessary because the council fully funds its own playgrounds. However, the public funding never materialised and there is still no guarantee that money will be ring-fenced in the 2017 budget either. However, after a meeting in City Hall last week, officials told residents to consider fundraising again, and they will try to match it with public

    Irish Examiner q
  • Gardaí sharpen focus on Islamic radicals

    Gardaí are expanding the size and expertise of its secretive unit tasked with combating Islamic extremists. The garda’s security chief told the Irish Examiner that the investment would enhance the strength and investigative skills of Counter Terrorism International. In response to recent criticism from frontline garda supervisors that they weren’t being briefed on the threat, or trained to deal with Brussels- or Paris-style attacks, assistant commissioner John O’Mahoney said a network of trained commanders had been put in place nationwide and training exercises held. Giving a rare in-depth interview, the head of garda crime and security said Counter-Terrorism International was being expanded.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Prisoners make 350 claims of serious assault

    Prisoners in Irish jails have made almost 350 complaints of serious assault and intimidation under a new complaints procedure introduced by the Irish Prison Service introduced in November 2012. However, only a small proportion of complaints were upheld following investigation. Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald revealed that a total of 348 Category A complaints were made against prison staff and other prisoners in the past three and a half years. Figures provided by the Irish Prison Service show that just 18 complaints have been validated, while 249 complaints — almost three in every four — were not upheld. One complaint was not proven while 57 complaints have not yet been fully investigated.

    Irish Examiner q