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  • Should you charge your phone overnight?

    Chances are, you plug in your phone before you go to bed at night, thinking it’s best to greet the morning with a fully charged device. Is this a good idea? That depends. Here’s the thing. Many people don’t expect to keep their phones for much longer than two years. For the most part, experts say, those people are not going to notice much damage to their phone batteries before they start hankering for a new device. If that sounds like you, feel free to charge every night, and as often as you like in between. But frequent charging takes a toll on the lithium-ion batteries in our phones. And it’s not because they can be overcharged, said Edo Campos, a spokesman for Anker, which produces phone chargers.

    The Irish Times q
  • Top model Alison Canavan admits battle with alcoholism

    Alison Canavan has revealed she has been struggling with alcoholism and an emotional article. The model mum began her international career aged just 15, and over her career shared catwalks with the likes of Naomi Campbell. Now aged 38 Alison has spoken for the first time about being alcoholic. Opening up: Alison admitted she is an alcoholic | VIPIRELAND.COM “I needed to drink to chat to people, for confidence, to have a personality, to be creative, to have friends, to be accepted and my job revolved around it. “I would use it to take off the edge, to cope with a tough day,” she wrote in the Sunday Independent’s Life magazine. “When a reason didn’t present itself I would make it up. “That’s the

    Irish Examiner q
  • What do the best paid graduates do in college?

    Want to earn €120,000 a year or €32,000? Opting for a particular course, or institution, because of the financial rewards it may bring is not a route many would advise school leavers receiving their CAO offers today to take. Nonetheless, figures from Emolument.com, which crowdsources market data, show the wide disparity in salary expectations certain careers – and colleges – can offer. As a guide – and note it’s just a guide, salary figures will depend not just on the college you opt for or the course you study, but also your own aptitudes as well as the company you work for – the data offers a useful insight. But remember, as construction and architect graduates experienced so vociferously during

    The Irish Times q
  • Burkini beach ban: must French Muslim women become invisible?

    It would be hard to find swimwear skimpy enough to cause offence on the French Riviera. It turns out that people are more easily shocked by the idea of covering up. With emotions still running high after the attacks on Bastille Day crowds in Nice and on a Normandy church, the mayor of Cannes instituted a ban on swimming at the city’s beaches in dress that could be held incompatible with morality, secularism, hygiene or safety – as well as anyone wading in fully clothed. No one was in any doubt of what he had in mind: the full-length, hooded two-piece for Muslim women, known as the burkini. Other local mayors followed suit, sparking fierce debate and legal challenges that have yet to be resolved

    The Irish Times q
  • Chinese cringe at wave of tourist misdeeds overseas

    Chen Xian from Beijing was returning to the US to continue her studies when she heard a fellow Chinese passenger shouting at the flight crew. While Chinese people are relishing their new freedoms to travel overseas, there are lots of tales of bad behaviour by tourists abroad, something most here find excruciating. China is now the world’s largest outbound travel market, with some 120 million people travelling overseas in 2015. Videos of a Chinese tourist taking a bath in a canal in Venice as his companion gives him a back rub, the feeding frenzy at a Thai buffet, the schoolboy writing graffiti at the Temple of Luxor and a woman slapping a sales assistant at the duty free shop at Los Angeles airport made headlines here and sparked outrage at people seen as bringing shame on China.

    The Irish Times q
  • Who won the lotto in Leitrim? Man with new tractor ‘suspicious’

    They will be looking out for new tractor owners in Leitrim this week following the news that the €11.1million winning lotto ticket was purchased in the local Spar in Kinlough. The owner of the Spar, Noel McGowan told RTE’s Morning Ireland that there had been lots of rumours in the village once the news broke. “There’s lots of rumours and speculation. We’ve no idea yet. There were lots of passersby on Saturday.” He added that there was “an odd peculiar movement” with one man seen driving a new tractor which he said was suspicious. “We’ll say nothing about it yet,” he joked. This is not the first time that Mr McGowan has sold a winning ticket. “Last October we sold a Lotto Plus Two jackpot of €250,000

    The Irish Times q
  • How to get in shape without joining the gym with bodyweight training

    You know the feeling. It’s Monday morning, you were meant to be in the gym smashing it on the cross trainer an hour ago but in a sleepy morning haze you’ve been hitting snooze since 5am and are now late for work. Never mind, you will have a detox tea today and go to the gym tomorrow.  And repeat. When it comes to getting in shape, joining the gym, buying the latest superfood and kitting yourself out with some new Lycra is the easy part. The hard part is getting moving. But what if you could get fit without actually leaving your bedroom? Well according to personal trainer Adam Wright you can. And, in fact, people have been doing just that for decades (although sadly there are no options which

    Evening Echo q
  • FAI links with THG and Pro10 of natural interest

    It is hard to imagine that John Delaney will ever end up sitting in a Brazilian police station answering whatever questions the Rio de Janeiro investigators would like to put to him. But given the number of links to the football world in this Olympic ticketing story it is not remotely surprising that they have expressed an interest in having a chat. The fact that THG and Pro10 both have such strong links to football and/or the FAI makes the association’s chief executive an obvious person to field questions about them. Certainly it seems almost inconceivable that the 48-year-old was not asked at some stage for his views on, and experience of, the firms and the people who run them. Delaney is certainly

    The Irish Times q
  • Boy wearing suicide belt detained in northern Iraq

    A young boy has been apprehended in the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk before he was able to detonate his explosives belt, police said. Local television footage shows a group of police officers holding the would-be bomber while two men are seen cutting off a belt of explosives. After they remove the belt, the boy is seen being rushed into a police truck and driven away. The boy was apprehended on Sunday night, less than an hour after a suicide bomb attack on a Shia mosque in the city. In that attack, only the bomber died but two other people were injured. Kirkuk intelligence official Chato Fadhil Humadi said the boy in the latest incident “claimed during interrogation that he had been kidnapped

    The Irish Times q
  • Watch Usain Bolt casually chucking a javelin miles after winning his ninth gold medal

    When Usain Bolt completed his triple treble, earning his ninth and final Olympic gold medal with the Jamaica 4x100m relay team, the world reflected on an all-time great and his illustrious track career. But just hours later in Rio’s Olympic stadium, with the lights out, those who hung around might have been fooled into thinking the Jamaican was training for a 10th Olympic gold. Franck Ballanger, a journalist in the Olympic Stadium, caught the footage in the early hours in Rio as Bolt engaged his fans around him with the traditional slow clap. And true to form, the fastest man in the world put in a pretty good throw. The throw was still some way off Germany’s Thomas Rohler, who posted 90.30 metres

    Irish Examiner q
  • Ryanair and low-cost airline rivals likely to cut prices

    Ryanair and its low-cost rivals are likely to have to cut ticket prices to stimulate growth, according to stockbrokers Davy. A new report by analyst Ross Harvey points out that earnings downgrades have cost European airlines 20 per cent of their value in the last two months. He notes that low-cost airlines such as Ryanair are continuing to see strong growth and are selling a greater proportion of their seats. However, he says that this now requires the “greatest degree of price stimulation” in more than two years. Unit revenues were down in the second quarter of the year and, while it is improving, peak summer pricing is weak. He says that Ryanair carries the best cost momentum going into the

    The Irish Times q
  • Dermot O'Leary negotiated a later start time for his X Factor return

    Dermot O’Leary negotiated a later daily starting time in his contract for his return as The X Factor’s presenter. Referring to the long working days during the initial audition phase of the ITV programme, he said: “My return was skilfully negotiated around a slightly later call time, which I cherish!” He added: “When you get your head around the fact you’re going to work until 2am then it’s fine, I don’t mind working till 2am as long as I don’t have to start at 8am the next day.” The popular presenter confessed to originally having reservations about returning but said he missed being a part of the “national conversation and culture”. An “emotional attachment” to The X Factor also drew him back.

    BreakingNews.ie q
  • Jenny Colgan’s school stories for grown-ups

    Described as “Malory Towers for grown-ups” by Sophie Kinsella, bestselling author Jenny Colgan’s first two books about a modern-day boarding school first appeared six years ago under the pseudonym Jane Beaton. At the time of publication, despite the internet’s inability to keep secrets, there was very little to link Colgan with Beaton, though she referred to the series in later interviews, as a kind of failed but much-beloved experiment. Now The Little School by the Sea is back, with both Class and Rules having been re-released this summer under Colgan’s name, and with more books in the pipeline. Colgan admits there’s a cringe factor to seeing the books in print again: “I wrote them in about 2008 when I, and, to be fair, just about the rest of the country had a massive crush on David Tennant as Doctor Who, so [the love interest] basically is him.

    The Irish Times q
  • A Dundalk player scored this stunning volley and people gave it the Alan Partridge treatment

    A stunning volleyed goal by Robbie Benson has put Dundalk right back in contention for a place in the Champions League, writes Stephen Barry. No Irish team has ever qualified for the group stages and it was looking unlikely after Legia Warsaw won the first leg in Dublin 2-0. However Benson’s cracking volley after 19 minutes of play puts Dundalk back in with a great chance. Their suspended captain Stephen O’Donnell was pretty happy in the TV3 studio. It was even reminiscent of Ireland’s best moment in recent European history – when Pat Sullivan’s volley helped put Shamrock Rovers into the Europa League group stages. People thought it deserved an Alan Partridge voiceover to capture its true genius.

    BreakingNews.ie q
  • Squatters living in derelict Dublin prison face jail terms

    Squatters who broke into and have been living in a disused prison in Dublin face terms of imprisonment for failing to comply with a High Court order. Ms Justice Deirdre Murphy granted the State leave on Monday to bring a motion before the court within the next two days seeking to attach and commit to prison the squatters for contempt of court. Barrister Joseph O’Sullivan told the court that the Department of Expenditure and the Office of Public Works considered the former debtors’ prison between Halston Street and Green Street to be unsafe. Last week, the State was granted an injunction restraining the squat and directing those in unlawful possession to vacate the property by Sunday. Mr O’Sullivan

    The Irish Times q
  • Coveney says there is an ‘assumption of guilt’ in Pat Hickey case

    Simon Coveney has defended the Government’s handling of the Olympic Council of Ireland ticketing controversy and said he believes a non-statutory inquiry is the correct way to try and establish what exactly happened. The Minister for Housing said he believed the appointment of a retired judge to head up an inquiry and the promise by the OCI to co-operate with the inquiry would clarify what happened that led to the arrest in Rio of OCI President, Pat Hickey. “I think the government has done all it can do - there is a legal case underway in Rio but I have to say that looking from afar the way people have been treated is surprising to say the least. Pat Hickey hasn’t been convicted of anything yet and he is being held in a high security prison,” he said.

    The Irish Times q
  • North Korea threatens first strike as South Korea, US begin drill

    North Korea has threatened a pre-emptive nuclear strike against South Korea and the United States after the two allies began annual military exercises, with tensions already running high after the defection of one of Pyongyang’s top diplomats in London. Tens of thousands of South Korean and US troops are taking part in the Ulchi Freedom Guardian drill, which runs until September 2nd. “They should properly know that from this moment the first-strike combined units of the KPA [Korean People’s Army] keep themselves fully ready to mount a pre-emptive retaliatory strike at all enemy attack groups involved in Ulchi Freedom Guardian,” the North’s news agency KCNA said in a report. The US-led UN Command

    The Irish Times q
  • Katie Waissel throws Diary Room tantrum after eviction nomination

    Katie Waissel threatened to quit Celebrity Big Brother after finding out she was up for eviction. The former X Factor hopeful had a meltdown and demanded to leave the house after discovering that pal Frankie Grande had put her up for the chop. She talked about it with Frankie – who is the brother of US pop star Ariana Grande – and other housemates, but broke down in tears after they told her there had been some discussion about her being “unstable” and “weak”. Shouting “Wow” at the top of her voice, Katie sought refuge in the bathroom before storming off to the Diary Room. She told Big Brother: “Can you please get me my things? I want to get the fuck out. Now.” Katie insisted she did not want

    Evening Echo q
  • Kingspan’s Gene Murtagh eyes further acquisitions

    Insulation and building materials group Kingspan is eyeing further acquisitions to add to the four rivals it has bought so far this year and is also considering entering new territories. The Irish group said on Monday that revenues rose 19 per cent in the six months ended June to €1.47 billion from €1.24 billion during the same period in 2015, while pretax profits grew 54 per cent to €154.8 million from €100.4 million. Speaking after the company published its results, chief executive Gene Murtagh, confirmed that it is looking at adding to the four businesses that it has bought so far this year. Suitors However, he stressed that there is no certainty that it will do any further deals as other

    The Irish Times q
  • Top tips from award-winning student chefs

    Jody Seed Winner of the Knorr student chef of the year competition in 2016 and a former student at Southern Regional College in Newry, Jody Seed is currently working at Newry Golf Club. “Meat is expensive, but nobody needs to eat it every day. If you are buying meat, I’d recommend going to the local butcher and keeping an eye out for the special deals. See if you can swap some items around. “There are some great basics for student meals, including omelettes and vegetable stir-frys. Pasta bakes are very handy as are mixed salads with basic dressings, though bags of salad are easily wasted and lettuce is easy to grow in little pots. And you can’t beat a cheap and cheerful bolognaise: it’s easy

    The Irish Times q