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  • Fintan O’Toole: Irish people do not get to elect a government

    When it comes to Irish elections, the bloody obvious is usually wrong. The most obvious thing about this election is that, on February 26th, the Irish people will go to the polls to choose a government. And it is simply not true. We don’t get to elect our government. We elect a parliament which in turn votes a government into office. Once we’ve cast our ballots we have absolutely no control over this process. So when we’re told over and over that we must think very carefully about which government we choose, it’s a big lie. If that’s what you think you’ll be doing on February 26th, you are suffering from delusions of grandeur. The honest reality is that none of us really knows what our elected

    The Irish Times q
  • $70/Month Is Too Much For Auto Insurance

    If you drive less than 50 miles per day, there is a way to pay less for auto insurance that few people realize. Are you overpaying?

  • Kerry driver guilty of crash perjury

    A woman twice testified in court that she was injured in a car crash in Cork despite the fact that she was probably 100km away in Kerry at the relevant time and yesterday she was sentenced for perjury. Remona O’Leary-Quilligan, of 35, Hazelwood Drive, Killarney, Co Kerry, gave evidence in Cork Circuit Court on October 12, 2011, that she was injured in a car crash in January 2009 involving her husband, from whom she since separated. Judge Séan Ó Donnabháin dismissed that claim in 2011. The dismissed case was appealed to the High Court where Mr Justice Eamon DeValera also dismissed the action in February 2012. Questioned by gardaí in April 2014 about the evidence she had given in the two court

    Irish Examiner q
  • Galway gardai appeal for information on missing woman

    Gardaí in Galway have appealed for information on the whereabouts of a 35-year-old woman who was reported missing last week. Margaret (Mags) Berry, originally from Co Mayo, was last seen on February 3rd in Galway city. She is believed to have walked from Salthill to Renmore, and the last signal from her mobile phone was traced to Renmore that same evening. It is understood that she was due to meet a friend for a meal and failed to turn up. Gardai are not treating the case as suspicious at this stage, but are keeping an open mind, and have asked for the public’s assistance. Ms Berry is described as 160 cm (5 ft 3 ins) in height, of slim build and with a sallow skin and freckles on her face. She

    The Irish Times q
  • Homeless man who shares €1.5m fund seeks part payment

    A homeless man, who shares a €1.5 million trust fund with his sister, is to ask a judge to make him a part payment of €4,500 to “keep a roof over his head” pending a trial to determine his full entitlement. Barrister Paul Howard told Judge Jacqueline Linnane in the Circuit Civil Court on Monday that she had earlier directed that €4,500 be paid to Declan Heffernan to provide him with shelter during the cold spell over Christmas and New Year. Mr Howard, who appeared for Mr Heffernan with solicitors CN Doherty and Co, said the earlier payment had been used to pay for hotel accommodation for him but that money had run out.

    The Irish Times q
  • Think of Connolly’s words before you vote

    Now that the General Election date has been set, and those elected will shortly pay tribute to those Irish men and women who took part in the rebellion of 1916, I suggest people should consider the words of James Connolly when he said: “If you remove the English army tomorrow and hoist the green flag over Dublin Castle, unless you set about the organisation of the Socialist Republic your efforts would be in vain. “England would still rule you. She would rule you through her capitalists, through her landlords, through her financiers, through the whole army of commercial and individualist institutions she has planted in this country watered with the tears of our mothers and the blood of our martyrs.”

    Irish Examiner q
  • Professor Green on his new documentary and why he's seen 'both sides of the coin'

    Professor Green has said his latest documentary on homelessness made him realise that he “no idea of the severity of the situation” or how “difficult it is to get out that situation when you find yourself in it”. The BBC Three documentary titled Professor Green: Hidden And Homeless, sees the singer, whose real name is Stephen Manderson, tackle the issue of homelessness among young people in the United Kingdom. He meets and spends time with people who have found themselves living on the streets or who are ‘sofa surfing’ and living in temporary accommodation. He told the Press Association: “The common misconception, there’s a massive misrepresentation of the homeless and that is just that they

    Irish Examiner q
  • Ireland’s top tech companies: who pays the most?

    There was some scratching of heads over the weekend when The Guardian showed that the average employee of Google in the UK is being paid twice as much as their colleagues across the Irish Sea. Figures from the tech giant’s latest UK accounts, revealed ahead of a UK Parliament Public Accounts Committee meeting this week, show that it paid wages of about £160,000 (€207,000) per head on its 2,500 staff. Here in Ireland however, the company’s 2,577 staff in Silicon Docks drew wages of €244 million in 2014, indicating an average wage of just €94,590, or €113,957 when stock based compensation is included. Such accounts aren’t always a completely accurate reflection of a company’s employee base - Google for example actually employs closer to 5,000 people in Ireland, despite what it says in its accounts.

    The Irish Times q
  • Garda attacked by pit bull terrier awarded €207,000 damages

    A member of An Garda Síochána, who thought he would die when attacked by two pit bull terriers, has been awarded €207,526 damages against the State. High Court judge Mr Justice Bernard Barton said in a reserved judgment he was satisfied that Det Garda John Leahy suffered an exacerbation of a degenerative condition in his back and left hip which required surgery after the incident. The State claimed it accepted the incident may have exacerbated Det Garda Leahy’s back condition, but denied it was sufficient enough to require surgery. Det Garda Leahy (52) told a Garda Compensation hearing that in June 2008 he was a member of the Divisional Drug Unit in Galway and had been patrolling in a car with Garda Orla Keenan when they noticed two known drug users near Wolfe Tone Bridge.

    The Irish Times q
  • Beatles’ legacy worth €105m to Liverpool yearly

    The legacy of The Beatles adds £81.9 million (€105m) to the Liverpool economy each year and supports 2,335 jobs, according to new research. A report commissioned by Liverpool City Council also revealed The Beatles-related economy is growing up to 15% a year, with “further significant growth potential”. It was produced by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) and the University of Liverpool through their Institute of Cultural Capital. The report was based on interviews with those connected with The Beatles industry including business owners, employees and tourists, and was supplemented by data from literature, previously conducted research and regional economic data. Lead author of the report,

    Irish Examiner q
  • Born in Ireland to Hong Kong parents: what Chinese New Year means to me

    Today is the first day of the Chinese New Year: the year of the monkey. If you were born in 1910, 1922, 1934, 1944, 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992 or 2004 it’s going to be a auspicious year for you, or so I’ve been told. I was told this and many other pieces of Chinese wisdom and traditions by my mum when I was growing up in Ireland as a child. Born in 1980 in Dublin to immigrant Chinese parents I was always curious about my heritage and culture. My mother and father, who met here in Ireland, came to the country in the 1970s when there were poor economic prospects in Hong Kong. Their reasons were not dissimilar from those of many young Irish adults, including myself, who travelled abroad to find work

    The Irish Times q
  • Taoiseach and Adams clash over Dublin hotel attack

    Taoiseach Enda Kenny has called on Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams to clarify if weapons used in an attack at Dublin’s Regency Hotel last Friday were previously owned by the Provisional IRA. Mr Adams said the Continuity IRA had admitted responsibility for the fatal shooting in Drumcondra, adding: “They are not the IRA. The IRA are gone and their weapons are gone. Enda Kenny knows that.” Minister for Justice Frances Fitzgerald yesterday confirmed a second Special Criminal Court will open on April 4th and condemned the shooting, in which one man was killed and two others were wounded, as “vile, audacious and highly sinister”. Mr Kenny repeated his criticism of Sinn Féin’s call for the original non-jury

    The Irish Times q
  • The Survivalist: The Irish sci-fi about to hit the big screen

    An Irish sci-fi script was chosen as one the hottest in Hollywood in 2012. As it hits the big screen this week, Ed Power talks to its writer and star ACH December, a countdown of the year’s hottest new movie scripts is circulated around Hollywood. Argo, Slumdog Millionaire and The King’s Speech are among the smashes to have featured on the quasi-mythical ‘Black List’. Should The Revenant win best picture at the Oscars this month, it will be fourth Black List pick to claim the accolade in the past eight years. Behold the closest thing in Tinseltown to a crystal ball. The list is typically crammed with tent-poles and awards season bait. However, in 2012, space was found for a low-key science fiction

    Irish Examiner q
  • Former hospice chief loses case against ‘Irish Examiner’

    The former CEO of Marymount Hospice in Cork yesterday lost his High Court bid to have two articles on the Irish Examiner website taken down after a judge ruled they were not defamatory. Mr Justice Max Barrett ruled the court reports which referred to Mr Dan Philpott’s leaving Marymount after seven months as CEO and a subsequent employment related court case which was settled were not defamatory and did not injure Mr Philpott’s reputation in the eyes of reasonable members of society. The judge rejected an application by Mr Philpott to have the published articles removed from the Irish Examiner website. Mr Justice Max Barrett said in the opinion of the court neither of the two articles published

    Irish Examiner q
  • Closure order served on Earl’s restaurant at UCD

    The Food Safety Authority of Ireland has served a closure order on Earl’s delicatessen and restaurant at UCD’s School of Architecture, at Richview, Clonskeagh in Dublin. The authority also served a prohibition order on Sheehan’s Butchers, Church Street, Caherciveen, Co Kerry. Both orders were made during January when the authority said it also carried out two successful prosecutions against Kelleghan Catering Food Stall, Main Street, Tallow, Waterford, and Millbridge Meats (butcher), Kilmacrennan, Co Donegal. According to the Food Safety Authority, the closure notice was served on Earl’s Delicatessen because there was “likely to be a grave and immediate danger to public health”. The authority

    The Irish Times q
  • Man who slept outside Burton office to face fitness-to-plead hearing

    A man, who was one of the homeless people prevented from sleeping outside a building used by Tánaiste Joan Burton’s department, is to face a fitness-to-plead hearing, a court has ordered. Patrick O’Sullivan, aged 41, who spent more 20 years as a long-stay patient with severe mental illness before being released from care, had been sleeping rough outside Gandon House on Amien St, in Dublin’s city centre, which is used by the Department of Social Protection. The privately owned building has been leased by the Office of Public Works on behalf of the State. Mr O’Sullivan is currently before Dublin District Court on minor public order and assault charges and has been allowed a preliminary hearing to determine if he is fit to plead.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Ex-jockey Darren Egan hit with 12-year ban

    Former jockey Darren Egan has been suspended from racing for 12 years. Egan was found guilty of corruption charges last November but the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has now published details of the length of his ban. The Longford man, a former leading apprentice, was found to have engaged in a conspiracy with unlicensed individual Philip Langford, who at the time was given an immediate exclusion order which will remain in place for at least the next 15 years. A BHA disciplinary panel said Langford laid Egan’s rides between June 17 and July 16, 2013, with the jockey charged with having deliberately ridden to lose in two of those races — at Chepstow (Imperial Spirit) on July 12 and at Bath (Tregereth) on July 16.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Kia plots youth-oriented BMW 3 Series rival

    We know now that Hyundai has its eyes squarely on the prize of snatching premium-badge sales from BMW and Audi, and will later this year launch its new Genesis luxury car brand in Europe to begin doing so. It’s an ambitious strategy, especially given the time and investment needed for, say, Lexus to start making an significant inroads into the European market, but Hyundai’s sister brand Kia may just have gone one better in the ambition stakes - it wants to take on, specifically, the BMW 3 Series. Plans are afoot within Kia for a new sporty compact saloon, potentially using a cut-down version of the rear-wheel-drive platform developed for Genesis’ products. Such a move would help to spread development

    The Irish Times q
  • Labour senator calls for Oireachtas dress code

    A Labour senator has called for an Oireachtas dress code to be introduced following the general election due to the “unprofessional” attire of some deputies. Senator Lorraine Higgins said it was “unacceptable that members of Dáil and Seanad Éireann would enter the chambers of our national parliament dressed in unsuitable attire”. “In 2011, the Oireachtas Committee on Procedures and Privileges drafted a proposal requesting TDs and Senators wear ‘appropriate business attire’ in their function as legislators. This has clearly not been heeded and a small cohort of deputies continue to dress in an unprofessional manner, unbefitting of our national parliament. “I am calling today on the Taoiseach and

    The Irish Times q
  • Peyton Manning: how the Bionic Man earned final Super Bowl shot

    Peyton Manning had asked for one more season of football and Mackie Shilstone delivered. Then on Sunday night, Shilstone sat in his New Orleans home and watched Manning take that final year and win a Super Bowl. “I had to break him into pieces and put him back together again,” Shilstone said into his phone as his television showed Manning with confetti falling all around like a golden winter squall. “I put him together and created the bionic man.” What Shilstone, the famed trainer, who has helped revive the careers of Serena Williams and Bernard Hopkins, did with Manning was get him good enough to play a few last football games. He made the Denver Broncos quarterback healthy, giving him a plan

    The Irish Times q
  • Man accused of asset transfer fraud in Dublin

    A businessman has allegedly attempted to frustrate the enforcement of a €6.9 million judgment obtained against him three years ago by fraudulently transferring properties which could be used to satisfy the debt, it has been claimed in the Commercial Court. John Meagher, who owned the properties in Dublin’s Charlemont Street, is still their beneficial owner because he provided money to a man to buy them in a rushed off-market transaction before a bank moved against Mr Meagher over his debt, it claimed. Charlefort Investments Ltd, which is part of property developers, the Clancourt Group, says in December 2014, one of its related companies took legal assignment of the €6.9m judgment obtained against Mr Meagher by Danske Bank in February 2013.

    Irish Examiner q