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  • Gang leaders thrive thanks to global nature of organised crime

    When an estimated 700 police officers across Europe and as far away as South Africa and Brazil executed a series of co-ordinated searches against the Spain-based Irish cartel led by Christy Kinahan 5½ years ago it became very clear how rich and powerful the gang had become. Its key members arrested in southern Spain were found in multimillion euro villas a far cry from the streets of the Republic they flood with drugs and the sink estates most of them grew up in back in Dublin. While the Criminal Assets Bureau had been established in the wake of the 1996 murder by the John Gilligan gang of crime journalist Veronica Guerin to confiscate the proceeds of crime, the globalisation of organised crime has played right into the hands of people such as Christy Kinahan and those around him.

    The Irish Times q
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  • FF will not go into Government with SF ‘under any circumstances’

    Micheál Martin has said Fianna Fáil will not go into Government with Sinn Féin “under any circumstances”. Mr Martin said he also will not go into Coalition with Fine Gael. Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams called Fianna Fáil’s stance as a “mistake”. He said this position made Fianna Fáil irrelevant in the general election and said Sinn Féin would enter Government as the largest party. Speaking during TV3’s leader debate on Thursday night, Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny and Labour leader Joan Burton said their proposition to the electorate was to re-elect the current Government. Mr Adams has said the party’s proposals to abolish the Special Criminal Court is one they have long held and insisted it was

    The Irish Times q
  • Garda: I was rugby tackled after querying fare in Dublin

    A garda yesterday claimed before the High Court when he was off duty, he was rugby tackled to the ground by other gardaí, handcuffed, and arrested after querying the price of a taxi home. Garda Oliver Cully, aged 55, who has been in the force over 30 years and works on protection duty at Áras and Uachtaráin, said he was left sitting on a Dublin street handcuffed until a Garda van came to take him to a station. He told a jury he felt totally embarrassed to be sitting in handcuffs on the street opposite a pub which is a “Garda haunt”. He had queried a charge of €35 for a taxi to Lucan in after he had left a Dublin city nightclub. He told the High Court he had 10 months later done the same journey

    Irish Examiner q
  • Candidate with autism targeted with ‘shocking’ online abuse

    An autistic general election candidate and her autistic children have been targeted by vile online abuse which branded them “inbred mongolians”. Another sick online message suggested that if they “commit mass suicide”, it would free up resources for “the humans”. Outspoken autism rights advocate, Fiona Pettit O’Leary, who has Aspergers, said she plans to report the series of horrific private Facebook messages to gardaí today. But the West Cork-based mother-of-five — two of whom are on the autistic spectrum — vowed last night not to be silenced by the online abuse. “I am a strong woman and I won’t be intimidated or bullied by these kinds of messages,” she said. “I am not going to go into hiding

    Irish Examiner q
  • How the Late Late Show helped spark a cultural revolution after the ‘bishop and the nightie’ affair

    Challenging the authority of the Church was not easy, but 50 years ago this week, Gay Byrne helped spark a cultural revolution with the ‘bishop and the nightie’ affair, writes Ryle Dwyer FRIDAY marks the 50th anniversary of the bishop and the nightie controversy, which really turned out to be what could be called a game changer in Irish politics. The controversy was sparked by a piece of light entertainment on Gay Byrne’s Late Late Show, which included a segment imitating a popular American TV game show, The Newly Wed Game. This was where husbands and wives were each asked the same questions separately to see how closely their answers would compare. A £5 prize was offered for the couple that

    Irish Examiner q
  • Donald Trump: Refugee crisis may signal the ‘end of Europe’

    US Republican presidential contender Donald Trump said German Chancellor Angela Merkel was wrong to let in thousands of migrants into Germany and that the refugee crisis could trigger revolutions and even the end of Europe. “I think Angela Merkel made a tragic mistake with the migrants,” Trump told French conservative weekly Valeurs Actuelles, which said it was the billionaire’s first in-depth campaign interview with European media. “If you don’t treat the situation competently and firmly, yes, it’s the end of Europe. You could face real revolutions,” Trump was quoted as saying, according to the French translation. The 69-year-old property magnate also said Brussels had become a breeding ground

    Irish Examiner q
  • Refugee crisis: Putin’s Russia in race with EU to see which will collapse first

    George Soros says Russian President Vladimir Putin is out to to foster disintegration of the EU by flooding it with Syrian refugees fleeing his bombing campaign THE leaders of the United States and the European Union are making a grievous error in thinking that President Vladimir Putin’s Russia is a potential ally in the fight against the Islamic State. The evidence contradicts them. Putin’s current aim is to foster the EU’s disintegration, and the best way to do so is to flood the EU with Syrian refugees. Russian planes have been bombing the civilian population in southern Syria forcing them to flee to Jordan and Lebanon. There are 20,000 Syrian refugees awaiting admission to Jordan. A smaller

    Irish Examiner q
  • Bruce Springsteen gig to spark havoc on Dublin club scene

    Bruce Springsteen isn’t going to be a popular man in Dublin club football circles this summer. GAA chiefs in the county admitted their domestic calendar has been thrown into disarray by changes to the Leinster championship calendar to facilitate Springsteen and the E Street Band playing at Croke Park on May 27. The Leinster SFC and SHC quarter-final double-header scheduled for May 29 has been brought forward by eight days with Dublin now scheduled to face Wexford in the hurling tie on May 21. But this means that Dublin SFC and IFC games will have to be re-fixed due to the unavailability of members of the senior hurling squad who play football with their clubs. “CCC Átha Cliath wishes to advise

    Irish Examiner q
  • Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Irish operator drops into red

    The company that operates the Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise across Ireland plunged into the red last year. Documents just filed with the Companies Office by Herbel Restaurants Ltd show that the firm recorded the losses after incurring exceptional costs of €4.4 million relating to the write-off of an inter-company loan and incurring a €5.6m loss on the disposal of fixed assets. The firm — which is owned by Michael Herbert, one of the North’s best known businessmen and who regularly appears on various rich lists — recorded pre-tax losses of €8.76m in the 15 months to the end of March last year. It had profits of €737,426 in 2013. Over the 15-month period, revenues increased to €18.33m from the

    Irish Examiner q
  • PICS: Liss Ard estate in West Cork— yours for €7.5m

    Liss Ard Estate, which has played host to singers, rock concerts and the rich and the infamous, and which was once bought for the Swiss government as a bolthole in case of a Soviet invasion or a nuclear war, is for sale, guiding at €7.5m. The estate, on almost 200 woodland acres near Skibbereen in West Cork, has variously been bought by a neurotic Swiss spymaster, a German art dealer, as a most private retreat, as well as opening twice as a manor hotel. Most recently it has been a wellness centre, and is home to a Sky Garden by the American artist James Turrell, where people lie on their backs on a stone slab, to look up at the sky through a man-made earthen crater. Liss Ard is rarely boring.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Nurses to get €20 weekly rise in ‘win-win’ deal

    Nurses are set to receive a pay boost of an average of €20 per week following an agreement that will see them taking on four tasks usually carried out by doctors. The deal essentially sees the restoration of the “unsocial hour” payment which nurses received for working in the evenings. The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO), Siptu Nursing, and the Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) took part in discussions as part of the Lansdowne Road Agreement, during October and November of last year, to agree the expansion of nursing/midwifery practice and restore premium pay of time plus one sixth which was removed from nurses/midwives under the Haddington Road Agreement. The four tasks, previously

    Irish Examiner q
  • Mother wiped dog faeces on child’s face

    A mother rubbed dog faeces on the face of her young daughter and pushed her down a staircase during a five-year period of neglect. The abuse by the 37-year-old mother of seven began when the child was aged five. Garda Donna Egan, who outlined the neglect in the child cruelty case, told Ennis District Court the case was “heartbreaking”. In one incident, Garda Egan said the girl recalled a dog dirtying the kitchen floor and was told by the mother to clean it up. “In the course of this, some of the dog dirt on the tissue was rubbed on the child’s face by her mother,” said the garda. The victim, now a teenager, also recalled her mother pushing her down the stairs and throwing a mug at her which struck

    Irish Examiner q
  • Election promises continue the attack on families with one income

    One-earner families enter the top tax bracket at €41,800 while two-income families do so at €65,600, writes Victoria White ARCHBISHOP Diarmuid Martin called this week for intervention by the mothers and grandmothers of the gangland criminals. He said they were “strong women” and “persons of wisdom”. Who knows if his plea will go anywhere. But at least he recognises the central role a parent can play, not just in a family, but in a society. Pity our aim is to put them out of business. This government has continued the work of governments since Charlie McCreevy’s tax individualisation budget in 1999 so that a married couple with two earners can currently bring home over €5,000 more than a married

    Irish Examiner q
  • Australia confirms pregnancy Zika case

    A pregnant woman in Australia has tested positive for the Zika virus after travelling overseas. The Queensland state Department of Health said the woman was diagnosed after returning from a trip abroad. It declined to provide additional details, such as which country the woman had visited, saying only it was not a locally-acquired case of the virus. Last week, another woman in Queensland was diagnosed with Zika after returning from El Salvador. Experts in Australia have said the risk of Zika spreading across the nation is extremely low. The type of mosquito that carries the virus only lives in the far north-east corner of the country, which is sparsely populated. Meanwhile, China’s first case

    Irish Examiner q
  • Taking Liberties with a new cafe: ‘The locals refer to it as Leg It’

    Meath Street is one of the last bastions of real Dublin where it’s possible to buy everything from pork tongues to knock-off handbags in one short stroll. In the heart of The Liberties, the street is alive with traders, especially on Thursdays to Saturdays when the Liberty Market is in full swing. Frenchman Damien Vossion decided to open his Legit cafe – a cool industrial-vibe eaterie – on the street due to its great character: “I had been looking in Phibsborough – where we [he and his partner Jamaycon Oliveria Figueirdo] live, but there was nothing to rent. “I just love the atmosphere on Meath Street – it reminds me of what Moore Street was a decade ago,” says Vossion. Having trained at a cookery

    The Irish Times q
  • Eamonn McCann: Bernie Sanders’s big problem is his own party

    It is a measure of the radical mood of America that virtually every presidential candidate who has so far come to the fore present themselves as an opponent of Wall Street chomping at the bit to storm the citadels of capitalism and drive the bankers and commodity traders out. Even Ohio governor John Kasich – a foreign policy hawk and adopted candidate of the stately New York Times – came second in New Hampshire after a campaign stressing views on healthcare and immigration which the Republican bureaucracy regards as heretical. The man Kasich dislodged from second place, Ted Cruz, is a Washington lawyer who went to work in the White House for George W Bush and then became solicitor general of

    The Irish Times q
  • Liverpool owners apologise to fans after U-turn

    Liverpool’s owners have performed a U-turn on proposed ticket increases after apologising to fans for getting their plans wrong. Principal owner and John W Henry and chairman Tom Werner were understood to be shocked at the sight of an estimated 10,000 fans walking out of Saturday’s Premier League match against Sunderland in the 77th minute in protest at increases next season which included a new £77 (€100) match ticket and the club’s first £1,000 (€1,288) season ticket. It is understood Henry and Werner were keen to stress they believe the connection between supporters is “unique and sacred” and that is the reason they have acted so swiftly to prevent further damage to their relationship with the fanbase. Revenue generated from ticket prices will be frozen at 2015-16 levels; this means the highest match-day price for a general admission ticket will remain at £59 (€76) — the lowest will be £9 (€11:60) and these tickets will be offered for every match with an allocation of 10,000 across the season.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Killarney promoted as winner of international award

    One of the country’s top tourist towns, Killarney, Co Kerry, is seeking to flag itself as a three-in-a-row of an international award. The Purple Flag is the international gold standard for night-time management of the economy and a safe and friendly environment from 5pm to 5am. Winners since 2014, an effort to retain the flag in 2016 was launched at Killarney Garda Station. Supt Flor Murphy said the award, while also acknowledging the Kerry town as a very desirable location, was a recognition of the commitment there was to safety and the sense of security in one of the country’s busiest tourist destinations. The award is presented by a team of international assessors. A record number of 10 cities

    Irish Examiner q
  • Impulse that brings referees to choose a life of Sundays filled with insult remains a mystery

    A permanent haze shrouds the dividing line between heroism and stupidity – somewhere in that haze live generations of GAA referees. The impulse that brings referees to choose of their own free will a life of Sundays filled with insult remains a profound mystery. GAA referees are largely devoid of the narcissism of their counterparts in the English Premier League, whose pursuit of cult status induces nausea. Nobody who watches — for example — Mark Clattenburg can doubt the scale of adoration that he exhibits for himself. And he is just the latest in a long line who wish the game to be a drama about themselves. Neither do GAA referees benefit from the international travel — or the immaculate grooming

    Irish Examiner q
  • Boy with no appropriate adult in his life is jailed in Dublin

    A 16-year-old boy has been imprisoned after a judge said she felt she had no option because of the lack of adult supervision in his life. Judge Melanie Greally heard that the teenager had nobody in court to support him, and has no appropriate adult in his life since his mother died five years ago. He had pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to burglary at The Avenue, Belgard Heights, Tallaght, on June 7, 2015. Judge Greally said it was with “deep regret” that she was imposing two and a half years detention. She said she hoped the “level of stability” he would get in a custodial environment would better equip him to deal with life on release. The judge suspended the last 18 months on

    Irish Examiner q