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  • Jamie Vardy really hated his old FIFA ranking

    Leictester City's Jamie Vardy really wasn’t happy with his old FIFA ranking. The Foxes hero has seen his reputation and value sky-rocket as he spearheads his side’s improbable title challenge. So when his player rating was significantly improved in the most recent FIFA 16 update - he took the opportunity to make his feelings clear about his old profile. Not impressed eh Jamie? Better score a few more against Arsenal at the weekend to make sure football fans get the point.

    Irish Examiner q
  • International take-up on Rising documentary ‘phenomenal’

    RTÉ’s documentary on the Easter Rising 1916 has been sold to 120 television stations in the United States and to the BBC. The $3 million (€2.6 million) three-part series begins on RTÉ One on Wednesday night. It was mostly funded by benefactors from the University of Notre Dame in the United States along with RTÉ and Section 481 funding. The documentary is narrated by the actor Liam Neeson. Neeson has said he was not aware of the Easter Rising going to school in Ballymena, Co Antrim. Neeson told RTÉ radio he first came across photographs of the signatories of the Proclamation when attending the Irish juvenile boxing championships in Dublin in 1966. “I hadn’t a clue who they were were. It lodged

    The Irish Times q
  • Support for Fine Gael and Labour falls in opinion poll

    Support for the two Government parties has fallen in the first opinion poll taken since the Dáil was dissolved and the election campaign began. Fine Gael has fallen one per cent to 30 per cent and Labour have dropped two points to eight per cent in the poll carried out for Paddy Power. The Red C poll revealed on Today with Seán O’Rourke on RTÉ Radio 1 also shows Fianna Fáil has increased support to 18 per cent while Sinn Féin is unchanged at 17 per cent. The Independents and others are at 25 per cent, an increase of two per cent since the latest poll. A breakdown of those figures show Independents are at 15 per cent, with four per cent for the Independent Alliance ; the Anti-Austerity Alliance/People

    The Irish Times q
  • Jason Corbett killing: Wife and father-in-law plead not guilty

    The wife and father-in-law of Co Limerick man Jason Corbett entered pleas of not guilty to charges of second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter in a US court on Wednesday. Molly Martens Corbett (32), and her father, Thomas Martens (65) - a former FBI agent - were charged last month and were each given bail on a $200,000 (€185,000) bond. Jason Corbett (39), died at his home in Wallburg, North Carolina, on August 2nd last year from head injuries allegedly inflicted with a baseball bat and paving stone following what authorities described at that time as a domestic disturbance. Davidson County Assistant District Attorney Greg Brown requested Superior Court Judge Mark E Klass to issue a court order to obtain copies of Mr Martens’ personnel file from the FBI.

    The Irish Times q
  • Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders coast to victory on a wave of voter anger

    Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders coasted to victory on a wave of voter anger in the New Hampshire presidential nominating contest, thrashing traditional US politicians in a display of anti-establishment power. Sweeping wins by Trump, a New York billionaire, and Sanders, a democratic socialist, testified to the sizeable share of American voters upset at US economic conditions and willing to send a shockwave to Washington in the November 8 presidential election. New Hampshire’s verdict sets up a tough fight for Republicans in South Carolina on February 20 and for Democrats there seven days later. Some of the most monumental campaign battles in elections past have been fought

    Irish Examiner q
  • Susan Whelan brings that winning feeling to Leicester City

    It is that sort of business, but just as Claudio Ranieri and his Leicester City side of previous unknowns are taking the Premier League by storm this season, so Susan Whelan, the club’s Dublin-born chief executive, is looking like quite a signing. Five years ago, when she was appointed to run the club, she had no football experience. Now, she is something of a seasoned pro, so to speak, and if a New Yorker cartoonist was to portray her at her desk, the turnover chart in the background would have one of those lines that has broken free of the graph and taken off up the wall towards the ceiling. Whelan started her rather circuitous journey to the top of the Premier League by working for her family’s

    The Irish Times q
  • Astronomers giddy with likely gravitational waves confirmation

    After a month of speculation, it’s looking likely now that the discovery of gravitational waves will be officially announced, and that’s a big deal for astrophysics and astronomy. The discovery of gravitational waves in the universe was first suggested last month following a surprising tweet from theoretical physicist and cosmologist Laurence M Krauss, which said that independent analysis had confirmed the cosmic phenomenon’s existence, but it had yet to be universally accepted by the science community. To put this in context, the mere existence of gravitational waves in science is being described by theoretical physicists like Krauss as being the dawn of “a new era in astronomy and physics”, with the waves having first been theorised by the one-and-only Albert Einstein.

    Silicon Republic q
  • Jessica Ennis-Hill’s coach won’t encourage her to defend title in Rio

    The spread of the Zika virus in Brazil has led to contrasting reactions from participating Olympic nations - with Germany’s chief Olympic doctor saying that there is not a threat to the 2016 Rio de Janeiro games, while the coach of reining heptathlon champion Jessica Ennis-Hill has said that he would not encourage his client to defend her title. The German Olympic Sports Confederation’s leading doctor, Bernd Wolfarth, says that the event does need to be monitored but it was up to the athletes themselves whether they attended. The mosquito-borne virus, which is widespread in Brazil and has been linked to birth defects, has prompted concern among athletes and sports officials around the world as they prepare for the August 5th-21st Games in Rio de Janeiro.

    The Irish Times q
  • Pyongyang executes army chief of staff, according to South Korean reports

    North Korea has executed its army chief of staff, Ri Yong Gil, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported yesterday, which, if true, would be the latest in a series of executions, purges and disappearances under its young leader. The news comes amid heightened tension surrounding isolated North Korea after its Sunday launch of a long-range rocket, which came about a month after it drew international condemnation for conducting its fourth nuclear test. A source familiar with North Korean affairs also told Reuters that Mr Ri, pictured above with leader Kim Jong-un, had been executed. Mr Ri, who was chief of the Korean People’s army general staff, was executed this month for corruption and factional

    The Irish Times q
  • Block on Northern Ireland abortion law reform 'would betray women': Amnesty

    Failure to reform Northern Ireland’s strict abortion laws would be a “betrayal of women”, according to Amnesty International. Proposals to allow terminations in certain limited circumstances are among a number of amendments to the Justice Bill being debated at the devolved Stormont Assembly. Patrick Corrigan, Amnesty’s regional programme director, said: “Northern Ireland’s abortion law dates from Victorian times, is among the most restrictive in the world and is in urgent need of reform. "A vote to stymie change today is a further betrayal of women and girls who will continue to be forced to travel outside Northern Ireland to seek the healthcare they are denied at home.” Unlike other parts of

    Irish Examiner q
  • Deadpool review: cheap, exploitative, unreconstructed rubbish

    Already the beneficiary of some bafflingly positive reviews, this squalid, misogynistic entertainment speaks of a chronic insecurity in the superhero universe. Constantly apologising for its own idiocy – the credits describe the director as “some douchebag” and the male lead as “God’s Perfect Idiot” – Deadpool plays like a dim 15-year-old’s impression of what a grown-up superhero film might look like. The protagonist still dresses in a leotard, but he says rude words and he gets to see actual bosoms. You don’t get that in Thor. You do, however, encounter such things in the dire Kick Ass and the worse Kingsman. Far from being any sort of innovation, the sweary, 16-cert po-mo action film now constitutes

    The Irish Times q
  • Gordon D’Arcy: Evidence Ireland adding a new attacking dimension to game

    The well-worn line about doing the jersey justice resonates in the wake of Paul O’Connell’s retirement from rugby. But a genuine tribute to Paulie’s legacy came with this collective performance against Wales. The base expectation I’ll always have watching Ireland is that everyone plays with unbridled passion. I saw that and plenty more last Sunday. The most encouraging aspect was the defensive excellence of Keith Earls and Andrew Trimble along with clear evidence that Joe Schmidt has added to the playbook. I’m out of Carton House since August. On Sunday I saw moves that have never been used by a Schmidt team, even in training, dating back to his arrival at Leinster in the summer of 2011. My only

    The Irish Times q
  • Man in direct provision appeals Minister’s refusal to let him work

    A man living in direct provision for more than seven years has appealed the Minister for Justice’s refusal to consider his application for permission to take up work here. A native of Bangladesh, the man arrived in 2008 and has been in direct provision since, awaiting a final determination of his application for refugee status, the three judge Court of Appeal heard. In a sworn statement, he said he has suffered “almost complete loss of autonomy” within direct provision, was on medication and suffered insomnia and depression. Work, even on a temporary basis, would “transform my existence”, he said. He was previously told he would be considered for a position as a chef if available to work and

    The Irish Times q
  • Major childcare cost cuts if Labour returned to power

    Tánaiste Joan Burton has pledged significant reductions in childcare costs if the Labour Party is returned to Government. Launching the plan along with Waterford Deputy Ciara Conway and Kildare South Councillor Mark Wall, Ms Burton said it was vital to provide low-cost quality childcare for all under-12s. Key elements of the Labour plan, called Standing Up For Families include: • A cap on childcare costs for parents at €4.25 per hour, or €170 per week; • A progressive increase in the State subsidy so the cost parents must pay is reduced to no more than €2 per hour by 2021; • Increased paid parental leave by three months, to be shared between both parents; • Transformation of the quality of early

    The Irish Times q
  • Cork County Council fined €50k over fatal tree-felling accident

    Cork County Council was ordered to pay €50,000 yesterday for a health and safety offence arising out of the investigation into the death of a workman during tree-felling more than three years ago. Michael O’Donovan, 44, a father of three from Aghabullogue, Co Cork, and an employee of Cork County Council, was killed while working on a compound off Carr’s Hill in Novem- ber 2012. Judge Séan Ó Donnabháin said at Cork Circuit Criminal Court: “This is a most unfortunate and sad case in which a man in the course of his work lost his life. “I am not satisfied the council had sufficient regard to the specialist nature of tree-felling. I am not impressed that they would be relying on buckshee certificates.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Ten great movie bromances

    Sometimes a buzz phrase captures a new addition to the cultural arsenal. Just as often, such a coining describes a phenomenon that was always there but that nobody bothered (or dared) to mention. In 1889 Arthur Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde met for a famous dinner at the Langham Hotel in London. The evening resulted in the commissioning of two durable works: Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and Conan Doyle’s The Sign of Four. A few short years later, during Oscar’s trial for gross indecency, Dorian Gray was quoted as evidence of the author’s “homosexual leanings”. Sherlock Holmes remained an ornament of eccentric respectability. Had Conan Doyle lived to be 150, he would have been surprised to

    The Irish Times q
  • Who is Enda Kenny? Is the Labour Party dead?...

    Google has revealed the most popular search terms used by those seeking information on the general election ahead of voting on February 26th. The search engine’s Irish office has said that since the election was called by Taoiseach Enda Kenny on February 3rd, the top five searches in Ireland on the election were: When is the election in Ireland?; Which constituency am I in? Who should I vote for?; Who to vote for in the 2016 Ireland elections?; Who will win the next Irish general election? Over the same period of time, the top related general election queries were Election candidates 2016; Election date 2016; Election register; Election poster rules; and Irish election polls. Over the last six

    The Irish Times q
  • Liverpool owners apologise to fans after U-turn

    Liverpool’s owners have performed a U-turn on proposed ticket increases after apologising to fans for getting their plans wrong. Principal owner and John W Henry and chairman Tom Werner were understood to be shocked at the sight of an estimated 10,000 fans walking out of Saturday’s Premier League match against Sunderland in the 77th minute in protest at increases next season which included a new £77 (€100) match ticket and the club’s first £1,000 (€1,288) season ticket. It is understood Henry and Werner were keen to stress they believe the connection between supporters is “unique and sacred” and that is the reason they have acted so swiftly to prevent further damage to their relationship with the fanbase. Revenue generated from ticket prices will be frozen at 2015-16 levels; this means the highest match-day price for a general admission ticket will remain at £59 (€76) — the lowest will be £9 (€11:60) and these tickets will be offered for every match with an allocation of 10,000 across the season.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Europe’s top four economies suffer drop in output

    Europe’s top four economies suffered steeper drops in industrial output during December than any analyst had forecast, a grim sign for the global economy as it struggles to sustain momentum. Wednesday’s industrial output data for Britain, France and Italy followed news a day earlier of a shock plunge in Germany, setting back expectations that economic growth across the continent might be picking up in 2016. Overall, the data will add to pressure on the European Central Bank to inject more stimulus into the economy at its meeting next month. The Bank of England last week cut its growth forecasts but said it still expected to hike interest rates rather than cut them. Industrial production in non-euro

    The Irish Times q
  • Twitter bows to advertisers with new timeline changes

    Twitter made a dramatic product change on Wednesday, saying it will recast the way it displays tweets on its homepage by customising them to individual users, instead of uniformly displaying tweets in reverse chronological order. The change to the timeline - as the homepage is known - is also designed to appeal to advertisers by giving more prominence to tweets that advertisers pay for to promote products. The change comes just hours before Twitter reports fourth-quarter earnings to investors, who have been pressuring the company to increase user growth and ad revenue by making the product easier to use. Reports that Twitter could be changing the timeline surfaced last week, prompting laments by users tweeting with the hashtag #RIPTwitter.

    The Irish Times q