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  • FF will not go into Government with SF ‘under any circumstances’

    Micheál Martin has said Fianna Fáil will not go into Government with Sinn Féin “under any circumstances”. Mr Martin said he also will not go into Coalition with Fine Gael. Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams called Fianna Fáil’s stance as a “mistake”. He said this position made Fianna Fáil irrelevant in the general election and said Sinn Féin would enter Government as the largest party. Speaking during TV3’s leader debate on Thursday night, Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny and Labour leader Joan Burton said their proposition to the electorate was to re-elect the current Government. Mr Adams has said the party’s proposals to abolish the Special Criminal Court is one they have long held and insisted it was

    The Irish Times q
  • $70/Month Is Too Much For Auto Insurance

    If you drive less than 50 miles per day, there is a way to pay less for auto insurance that few people realize. Are you overpaying?

  • Nurses to get €20 weekly rise in ‘win-win’ deal

    Nurses are set to receive a pay boost of an average of €20 per week following an agreement that will see them taking on four tasks usually carried out by doctors. The deal essentially sees the restoration of the “unsocial hour” payment which nurses received for working in the evenings. The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO), Siptu Nursing, and the Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) took part in discussions as part of the Lansdowne Road Agreement, during October and November of last year, to agree the expansion of nursing/midwifery practice and restore premium pay of time plus one sixth which was removed from nurses/midwives under the Haddington Road Agreement. The four tasks, previously

    Irish Examiner q
  • Garda: I was rugby tackled after querying fare in Dublin

    A garda yesterday claimed before the High Court when he was off duty, he was rugby tackled to the ground by other gardaí, handcuffed, and arrested after querying the price of a taxi home. Garda Oliver Cully, aged 55, who has been in the force over 30 years and works on protection duty at Áras and Uachtaráin, said he was left sitting on a Dublin street handcuffed until a Garda van came to take him to a station. He told a jury he felt totally embarrassed to be sitting in handcuffs on the street opposite a pub which is a “Garda haunt”. He had queried a charge of €35 for a taxi to Lucan in after he had left a Dublin city nightclub. He told the High Court he had 10 months later done the same journey

    Irish Examiner q
  • Candidate with autism targeted with ‘shocking’ online abuse

    An autistic general election candidate and her autistic children have been targeted by vile online abuse which branded them “inbred mongolians”. Another sick online message suggested that if they “commit mass suicide”, it would free up resources for “the humans”. Outspoken autism rights advocate, Fiona Pettit O’Leary, who has Aspergers, said she plans to report the series of horrific private Facebook messages to gardaí today. But the West Cork-based mother-of-five — two of whom are on the autistic spectrum — vowed last night not to be silenced by the online abuse. “I am a strong woman and I won’t be intimidated or bullied by these kinds of messages,” she said. “I am not going to go into hiding

    Irish Examiner q
  • Donald Trump: Refugee crisis may signal the ‘end of Europe’

    US Republican presidential contender Donald Trump said German Chancellor Angela Merkel was wrong to let in thousands of migrants into Germany and that the refugee crisis could trigger revolutions and even the end of Europe. “I think Angela Merkel made a tragic mistake with the migrants,” Trump told French conservative weekly Valeurs Actuelles, which said it was the billionaire’s first in-depth campaign interview with European media. “If you don’t treat the situation competently and firmly, yes, it’s the end of Europe. You could face real revolutions,” Trump was quoted as saying, according to the French translation. The 69-year-old property magnate also said Brussels had become a breeding ground

    Irish Examiner q
  • David Cameron praises ‘great icon’ Terry Wogan

    British prime minister David Cameron has paid tribute to Terry Wogan in the House of Commons, describing how he grew up listening to the broadcaster, who died of cancer last month. “Terry Wogan was one of this country’s great icons,” he said. “Like many people in the House, I felt almost as if I had grown up with him, listening to him on the radio in the car, watching him present ‘Blankety Blank’ or all the many other things he did. “Perhaps many people’s favourite was the ‘Eurovision Song Contest’, to which he brought such great humour every year. You did not have to be a ‘TOG’ ( Terry’s Old Geezers and Gals) to be an enormous fan. I think that we were all fans, and he will be hugely missed,”

    The Irish Times q
  • Pyongyang executes army chief of staff, according to South Korean reports

    North Korea has executed its army chief of staff, Ri Yong Gil, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported yesterday, which, if true, would be the latest in a series of executions, purges and disappearances under its young leader. The news comes amid heightened tension surrounding isolated North Korea after its Sunday launch of a long-range rocket, which came about a month after it drew international condemnation for conducting its fourth nuclear test. A source familiar with North Korean affairs also told Reuters that Mr Ri, pictured above with leader Kim Jong-un, had been executed. Mr Ri, who was chief of the Korean People’s army general staff, was executed this month for corruption and factional

    The Irish Times q
  • TV review 1916: I’m quite taken with Liam Neeson’s theory on the Rising

    The very name of this three-part documentary is like a proclamation. By calling it 1916 (RTÉ One, 9.35pm, Wednesday), filmmaker Bríona Nic Dhiarmada appears to be declaring that while the TV schedules are cluttered with commemorative programming, all you need to know about the Rising is here. Its landmark TV status is further burnished by Liam Neeson as voiceover and a a full-blooded, atmospheric soundtrack from Patrick Cassidy. While no documentary about an historical event can be viewed as definitive – not least because as an academic discipline, history studies is built on historians contradicting each other – 1916 succeeds superbly on two fronts: it is lucid, accessible storytelling that creates a vivid and vibrant image of the time; and its editorial viewpoint, that the Rising must be seen in an international context, is a convincing and appealing one.

    The Irish Times q
  • Mother wiped dog faeces on child’s face

    A mother rubbed dog faeces on the face of her young daughter and pushed her down a staircase during a five-year period of neglect. The abuse by the 37-year-old mother of seven began when the child was aged five. Garda Donna Egan, who outlined the neglect in the child cruelty case, told Ennis District Court the case was “heartbreaking”. In one incident, Garda Egan said the girl recalled a dog dirtying the kitchen floor and was told by the mother to clean it up. “In the course of this, some of the dog dirt on the tissue was rubbed on the child’s face by her mother,” said the garda. The victim, now a teenager, also recalled her mother pushing her down the stairs and throwing a mug at her which struck

    Irish Examiner q
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  • Refugee crisis: Putin’s Russia in race with EU to see which will collapse first

    George Soros says Russian President Vladimir Putin is out to to foster disintegration of the EU by flooding it with Syrian refugees fleeing his bombing campaign THE leaders of the United States and the European Union are making a grievous error in thinking that President Vladimir Putin’s Russia is a potential ally in the fight against the Islamic State. The evidence contradicts them. Putin’s current aim is to foster the EU’s disintegration, and the best way to do so is to flood the EU with Syrian refugees. Russian planes have been bombing the civilian population in southern Syria forcing them to flee to Jordan and Lebanon. There are 20,000 Syrian refugees awaiting admission to Jordan. A smaller

    Irish Examiner q
  • How the Late Late Show helped spark a cultural revolution after the ‘bishop and the nightie’ affair

    Challenging the authority of the Church was not easy, but 50 years ago this week, Gay Byrne helped spark a cultural revolution with the ‘bishop and the nightie’ affair, writes Ryle Dwyer FRIDAY marks the 50th anniversary of the bishop and the nightie controversy, which really turned out to be what could be called a game changer in Irish politics. The controversy was sparked by a piece of light entertainment on Gay Byrne’s Late Late Show, which included a segment imitating a popular American TV game show, The Newly Wed Game. This was where husbands and wives were each asked the same questions separately to see how closely their answers would compare. A £5 prize was offered for the couple that

    Irish Examiner q
  • No second Brexit vote in event of ‘wrong answer’, ambassador says

    The British government will not hold a second referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union “if the people deliver the wrong answer” in the vote expected to take place later this year, the British ambassador to Ireland has said. Dominick Chilcott said the “strategic aim” was to keep the UK inside a reformed European Union and that proposals tabled by European Council president Donald Tusk could form the basis of a deal on the UK’s demands for changes in how the union works. He said agreement could be reached as early as next Thursday, in which case the in-out referendum could take place on June 23rd. “The government has made clear that it will be a one-shot referendum. There will be

    The Irish Times q
  • Taking Liberties with a new cafe: ‘The locals refer to it as Leg It’

    Meath Street is one of the last bastions of real Dublin where it’s possible to buy everything from pork tongues to knock-off handbags in one short stroll. In the heart of The Liberties, the street is alive with traders, especially on Thursdays to Saturdays when the Liberty Market is in full swing. Frenchman Damien Vossion decided to open his Legit cafe – a cool industrial-vibe eaterie – on the street due to its great character: “I had been looking in Phibsborough – where we [he and his partner Jamaycon Oliveria Figueirdo] live, but there was nothing to rent. “I just love the atmosphere on Meath Street – it reminds me of what Moore Street was a decade ago,” says Vossion. Having trained at a cookery

    The Irish Times q
  • Engineer avoids jail over beating in Dublin

    An Egyptian engineer who says he came to Ireland after his family were killed in a bomb attack has avoided a jail term for beating his flatmate with a belt during a tenancy dispute. Garda Paul Newport said Mina Fanous, aged 35, had turned up at the apartment he had lived in and told the flatmate he had rights as a tenant before hitting her with the belt. His defence counsel submitted he had come to Ireland after his wife and child we killed in a bomb in Alexandria, although there was no documentation to prove this. Fanous, of no fixed abode, pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to assaulting Jiagua Chen causing her harm, stealing her Samsung phone, and causing criminal damage to her

    Irish Examiner q
  • St Raphael's centre closed after damning HIQA report

    A residential centre for people with disabilities in Co Kildare has been closed by St John of God Services after a damning inspection report from HIQA. Residents from two other centres have also been moved. The centres are on the St Raphael's campus in Celbridge, which is home to 137 people with intellectual disabilities. HIQA inspections early last year prompted significant concerns about residents' safety and quality of life. The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation had also expressed concerns, saying St Raphael's had inadequate staffing levels and an inappropriate skill-mix. CEO of Inclusion Ireland Paddy Connolly said some improvements were made, but that they did not go far enough. He

    Irish Examiner q
  • Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Irish operator drops into red

    The company that operates the Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise across Ireland plunged into the red last year. Documents just filed with the Companies Office by Herbel Restaurants Ltd show that the firm recorded the losses after incurring exceptional costs of €4.4 million relating to the write-off of an inter-company loan and incurring a €5.6m loss on the disposal of fixed assets. The firm — which is owned by Michael Herbert, one of the North’s best known businessmen and who regularly appears on various rich lists — recorded pre-tax losses of €8.76m in the 15 months to the end of March last year. It had profits of €737,426 in 2013. Over the 15-month period, revenues increased to €18.33m from the

    Irish Examiner q
  • Boy with no appropriate adult in his life is jailed in Dublin

    A 16-year-old boy has been imprisoned after a judge said she felt she had no option because of the lack of adult supervision in his life. Judge Melanie Greally heard that the teenager had nobody in court to support him, and has no appropriate adult in his life since his mother died five years ago. He had pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to burglary at The Avenue, Belgard Heights, Tallaght, on June 7, 2015. Judge Greally said it was with “deep regret” that she was imposing two and a half years detention. She said she hoped the “level of stability” he would get in a custodial environment would better equip him to deal with life on release. The judge suspended the last 18 months on

    Irish Examiner q
  • This video of kids giving dating advice is delightful

    You know who adults don’t consult enough for advice? Kids. We’re underutilising their usually straightforward and honest perspective - especially when it come to the complicated matters of the heart. In this utterly charming video from Canoodle Content, a guy seeks advice on that most modern of dating problems - whether to text or call. The kids have varying but pretty solid advice on the subject and even give him pointers on what to say. See? Just keep it simple. We want to hear more about that eight minute relationship though. This is episode 3 of a series - and the kids have advice on everything from how to approach someone at the bar to how long to wait before texting someone. Wise beyond

    Irish Examiner q
  • Beaumont Hospital asks patients to stay away unless an emergency

    One of the country's busiest emergency departments is urging people to stay away unless absolutely necessary. Dublin's Beaumont Hospital says it's instigating a number of measures to combat difficult conditions being experienced by patients and staff - due to overcrowding. Management are also asking GPs not to send patients to the ED except in the case of emergency.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Colossus Andrew Porter about far more than just raw power

    If you watched Ireland’s U20s take on Wales in Dublin last Friday evening then chances are that the sheer size of the Leinster loosehead prop Andrew Porter stood out every bit as much as the abandon with which Nigel Carolan’s offloading side played. An impressive performer on Ireland’s Junior World Cup team last year, Porter’s performances have had to vie with his sheer proportions for attention with Carolan saying late last month that the player was already bigger than most senior props in the business. So, just how big is he right now? “I’d be about 119kg, getting there,” he said yesterday through a broad smile. Word on the grapevine is he is breaking all sorts of gym records. “Yeah, well I

    Irish Examiner q