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  • Car insurance comes at a premium for drivers who have no choice

    Irish roads were undergoing a time of carnage. In 2015 and into this year, that all changed and the cost of car insurance has risen dramatically, despite there not being a major spike in accidents. The average cost of insurance has, according to the Society of the Irish Motor Industry (SIMI), risen by a third in a year. The sad and immediate answer seems to be massive imprudent trading over the past few years by major Irish insurers.

    The Irish Times q
  • Driver could not see unlit trailer, trial told

    A farmer whose unlit trailer suffered a puncture at the side of the road has gone on trial in Letterkenny, Co Donegal, accused of causing death by dangerous driving. Adrian McCool, from Old Admiran, Stranorlar, who pleads not guilty, is accused of causing the death of John O’Donnell (53) at Cappry, outside Ballybofey, on November 13th, 2013. Mr McCool pleaded guilty to three road traffic offences relating to the same incident including failing to have lights on a sheep trailer on the night of the crash. The court heard how Mr McCool had pulled over on the road at about 7.35pm after a trailer tyre suffered a puncture. Patricia McLaughlin, for the DPP, told the jury before Judge John O’Hagan that

    The Irish Times q
  • No fairytale ending for Paul O'Connell as Toulon left reeling

    Shock was the overriding emotion on the Cote d’Azur as Paul O’Connell announced his immediate retirement from the sport he has graced so magnificently over the last 14 years. The Munster man was Toulon’s marquee signing last summer in the pack, one of the so-called ‘Fantastic Four’ recruited by club president Mourad Boudjellal, along with American Samu Manoa, New Zealander Ma’a Nonu, and Duane Vermeulen of South Africa. La Provence, the main Mediterranean newspaper, described the news of O’Connell’s retirement as “an immense blow”, while Var Martin, Toulon’s local paper, called the announcement “incredible”. In truth, there had been an inkling on Monday morning that the former British and Irish Lions captain might never be seen in a Toulon shirt when Midi Olympique, France’s rugby newspaper, revealed that the European champions were looking to recruit a second-row on a short-term contract.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Luas drivers say they have been grossly underpaid

    Luas drivers believe that historically they have been grossly underpaid for the role they perform in stressful and demanding environments. Driver and Siptu shop steward Richard McCarthy says that from his cab he operates routes that vary from areas thronged with pedestrians and other traffic to very isolated areas. He says there is also an “element of danger”. He says drivers have been attacked as they sought to fix door problems in their trams. He said some have been threatened with knives while verbal abuse was not uncommon. “We are portrayed as people who just push a lever back and forth. However the actual job itself is involved and can be quite complex. There is quite a complex signalling

    The Irish Times q
  • Paul O’Connell was always one tough Cookie

    It was 1995 when a certain “tall, gangly looking fella with a red head of hair” arrived at Young Munster for the first time. Gerry Casey, the hero of three Munster Cup victories for the proud Limerick club between 1980 and 1980, had moved on to the presidency and quickly became aware of the considerable potential of the youngster in question. His name? Paul O’Connell. “Paul’s father, Mick, had played for the club and was obviously a powerful influence on him and even though swimming was more his sporting interest at the time, he quickly settled down with us,” Casey recalled. “He was attending Ardscoil Rís at the time where he also benefited from the coaching of Des Harty and made the Irish Schools

    Irish Examiner q
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  • New video shows moments after Regency hotel shooting

    Disturbing eye-witness footage of the scenes just moments after David Byrne was shot dead at the Regency Hotel last Friday have emerged, showing the assassins making their getaway and what happened before gardai arrived. The Irish Examiner obtained the video on Wednesday evening as Government continued to face questions over why officers were not present at the event and why it took them so long to respond. The footage, which lasts for one minute and was taken on a mobile phone by a shocked bystander, shows Mr Byrne's bloodied body lying motionless beside the counter at the entrance of the hotel. Locals attending the event then go outside, where they see a silver van slowly driving away. "There's

    Irish Examiner q
  • VIDEO: Parents allow Galway teen to quit school to pursue Youtube business dream

    A persuasive Galway teen used a 29-slide powerpoint presentation to get his parents’ permission to quit school. Conor O’Flaherty had to go through six presentation drafts before his parents finally gave the thumbs up for the 17-year-old to chase an online business dream. His plan paid off. The teen entrepreneur, in his first year of business, secured a €5,000 bursary prize at the SCCUL Enterprise Awards. But, significantly, his online talent management agency, Pursue, is making lucrative advertising commissions for rising YouTube video stars across the world. Helping his clients earn hundreds of thousands, he has big plans for 2016. He is expected to turn over more than €2m in commissions. Conor,

    Irish Examiner q
  • Arlene Foster speaks of her ‘difficulties’ with Martin McGuinness

    The North’s First Minister, Arlene Foster, has spoken of her difficulties with Martin McGuinness because he delivered a graveside oration for the IRA man she believes tried to murder her father. In 1986 the current Deputy First Minister, Mr McGuinness, described Séamus McElwaine as a “saint” when compared with then British prime minister Margaret Thatcher and US president Ronald Reagan. He was speaking at the funeral of McElwaine, who was shot dead by the SAS in April 1986 as he was preparing to ambush a British army patrol near Roslea, Co Fermanagh. He also said McElwaine was a “freedom fighter murdered by a British terrorist” and that he was a “highly intelligent volunteer”. Family home DUP

    The Irish Times q
  • Indian priest claimed superiors knew he abused before

    The Catholic diocese of Palm Beach in Florida was not informed that a priest convicted there last year on charges related to child abuse had a similar history in India. Strabane-born Fr John Gallagher began canon law proceedings last summer against the Florida diocese after he was disciplined for raising questions about the Indian priest’s conduct. The case by the Irish priest against Bishop Gerald Barbarito now rests with the Vatican’s new tribunal of accountability, set up to investigate the actions of bishops when faced with child abuse allegations. Fr Jose Palimattom, who began working in Palm Beach in late 2014, admitted showing obscene images to a minor there on January 4th 2015. He subsequently

    The Irish Times q
  • Experts expected to announce they've found Einstein's gravitational waves

    Scientists may be poised to make a major announcement that will open a new window on the universe. A US team is rumoured to have caught the first glimpse of gravitational waves, ripples in space time predicted by Albert Einstein 100 years ago. An update on the search for gravitational waves is due to be released on Thursday, but a tight lid is being kept on the information until then. Gravitational waves are theoretically generated by cataclysmic cosmic events such as the collision of black holes or super-dense neutron stars. As the waves spread out, they compress and stretch spacetime. Scientists hope to detect them using laser beams capable of measuring minute changes in the lengths of two

    Irish Examiner q
  • QUIZ: What should you give up for Lent this year?

    It’s Ash Wednesday and Catholics worldwide are heading into mass today so a priest can make the sign of the cross in ash on their forehead. It’s one of the more unusual Catholic rituals - and it’s been inspiring some amusing reactions on social media. And Ash Wednesday, is, of course the first day of Lent. And although it feels like Dry January just ended, many people will be giving up one or more of their vices for the next forty days (excluding St Patrick’s Day, obviously). If you feel like taking on a Lenten challenge, take our quiz to find out which of your indulgences you should be forgoing. Feel free to ignore this obviously. We’re not the boss of you. H/T: BreakingNews.ie

    Irish Examiner q
  • You will not believe what this Kilkenny artist can do on his iPad

    As a child, Noel Campion loved art but a lack of funds meant he never got to finish his degree course. As he got older art became something he associated with his youth — that is until he discovered the Apple app, Procreate, on his iPad. I remember when I was in second year in secondary school deciding that I wanted to go to art college. My parents thought I was mad and told me that artists never had any money and that you couldn’t make a living out of it, but sure I knew better. I had such a passion for drawing and painting at the time that I didn’t even consider any other career, I just wanted to follow my dream. Hailing from Kilkenny, I succeeded in getting a place in Crawford Art College

    Irish Examiner q
  • Gardaí target 40 criminals in Dublin killing aftermath

    Gardaí are operating “in-your-face policing” at the homes of more than 40 criminals linked to the cartel blamed for Monday’s gangland murder of Eddie Hutch in Dublin’s north inner city. The Irish Examiner understands that members of four linked gangs, along with their associates, have been targeted for the high-level Garda attention. Under the plan, drawn up by Garda HQ, officers have identified houses in the Crumlin, Drimnagh and south inner city areas of south Dublin. According to sources, the strategy includes “in-your- face policing”, such as use of stop-and-search powers and the setting up of checkpoints outside their homes. It is further understood that Garda security intelligence rates

    Irish Examiner q
  • Donald Trump’s rivals face barrage of attacks

    Billionaire takes Cruz to task by repeating supporter’s ‘vulgar slur’. Eyeing their first wins in a capricious campaign, Republican Donald Trump lashed out at his opponents as New Hampshire began voting in the first US presidential primary. Trump — calling on supporters to propel him to victory — stunned, appalled, and delighted different audiences as he repeated an offensive remark from a member of the crowd about Ted Cruz’s position on waterboarding. The billionaire businessman launched the harshest attacks — not just against Texas senator Mr Cruz, who had bested him in Iowa, but against Jeb Bush as well. The former Florida governor was one of three Republicans hoping Marco Rubio’s recent stumbles

    Irish Examiner q
  • Japanese designers have developed a 'wearable chair'

    Aching legs from standing up for too long could soon be consigned to the past after designers in Japan developed a wearable chair that straps onto your body. Respite can be found at any time when wearing the Archelis, or “wearable chair”, as it locks into place once users relax their legs and allows people to walk as they’re wearing it. Archelis was initially built for surgeons who spend hours in the operating theatre but it could catch the eye of tired waiters, bored bar staff and even the weary commuter. Mold company Nitto developed the chair alongside Chiba University and said the release date and price of the product was currently “undecided”.

    Irish Examiner q
  • LIT’s late show breaks UCC hearts

    Limerick IT 2-15 UCC 1-14: The permutations were many heading into this sink-or-swim contest for the hurlers of UCC. In the end, not one of them was relevant; UCC crashing out of the Fitzgibbon Cup at the group stages for a second successive year. Ger Cunningham’s charges required at least a two-point win to ensure their place in the quarter-final draw at the expense of Davy Fitzgerald’s Limerick IT. Victory alone, however, proved beyond the home outfit yesterday, a David Dempsey goal on 56 minutes condemning UCC to their second defeat of the group stages. Alan Cadogan’s goal four minutes earlier had put UCC into a 1-13 to 1-12 lead, but as they pushed forward in the closing stages in chase of

    Irish Examiner q
  • The Irish Times view: A welcome move to restore the heart of Dublin city

    College Green is unquestionably Dublin’s great architectural set-piece and has been celebrated as such since the 1790s, when it featured in James Malton’s famous prints of the city’s landmarks. It is also the centre of Dublin, the place where we congregate for major public occasions and celebrations. Dublin City Council’s latest plan to re-order the plaza, which is going to public consultation next month, would remove east-west traffic to enable the creation of an exclusive pedestrian zone, with buses, trams and taxis (at least initially) traversing its eastern flank, in front of Trinity College. Motorists would have to find alternative routes, while buses currently running on Dame Street would be accommodated elsewhere – for example, by making Parliament Street a two-way bus corridor.

    The Irish Times q
  • Utopian glow off Sinn Féin will fade once they get closer to power

    Sinn Féin promise to unburden us of austerity, but they will also unbound the restraints of a law-based society, writes Gerard Howlin YESTERDAY the Sinn Féin manifesto was published. Freeze frame the picture from Monday night’s debate between the finance spokesmen of the four main parties on RTÉ’s Claire Byrne Live. It is not just that with Sinn Féin’s arrival there is another chair on stage, the dynamic has changed too. It tightens the space within the conversation Labour has left to manoeuvre in. Not only had the other three a little less time, thematically Labour was squeezed between being in government on the one hand and Sinn Féin being free to roam on its left, on the other. Sinn Féin is

    Irish Examiner q
  • Judge rejects State bid to confiscate prostitutes’ cash

    A judge has rejected a State application to confiscate the “hard-earned” income of two prostitutes which was stolen and later recovered. Judge Patrick McCartan made the order at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court following the sentence hearing of a man who robbed the women while pretending to be a client. The judge also praised the courage of the women in trying to stop the accused after the robbery. Mantas Grazevicius, aged 32, with an address in Manchester but from Lithuania, pleaded not guilty to false imprisonment and robbery of the two women at the Clyde Court Hotel, Lansdowne Rd, Dublin, on July 17, 2013. He was convicted on all counts last month. Judge McCartan jailed him for three years and

    Irish Examiner q
  • Michael Harding: Even death can’t uncouple my soul friends and me

    I don’t have many friends and they are usually very far away, but I can’t live without them. Some of them I started out with, in school or college or in the first wild years of being free as an adult on the streets of the world. Some of them are new. Some are younger than me and some are older. But these are not “mates” or “acquaintances” I met through work or drinking in public houses. These are soul friends, like lovers entwined unconsciously with my life, because I am what my friends have made of me and I exist only in relation to my friends. Recently in a crowded room in Dublin I saw an old friend by chance. I went up to him and said, “I miss you.” And he just said, “I miss you, too”, and

    The Irish Times q