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  • North Cork couple fled in fear after pair attacked them in bedroom

    A couple who were at home in bed in North Cork were terrified when a man armed with a sledgehammer and a woman carrying an iron bar smashed their way into their bedroom and demand thousands of euro in cash. The duo behind the aggravated burglary — a couple who have five children — were both jailed for five years yesterday at Cork Circuit Criminal Court. Detective Garda Padraig Reddington outlined the background to the case where John O’Donnell, aged 37, of Bansha, Co Tipperary, and Angelique Arundel, aged 30, of 54 Shannon Lawn, Mayfield, Cork, both pleaded guilty to aggravated burglary at the home of Frank Foley, of Churchtown, Mallow, Co Cork, between 10pm on August 28 and 2am on August 29, 2015.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Garda in serious condition after crash wakes from induced coma

    A garda who has been in a very serious condition after a crash in which a pensioner was killed has woken from an induced coma. It is understood Garda Sharon Casserly — who suffered a stroke post-surgery — recognised her fiancé and a brother when she was taken off the ventilator. Sources said she was able to breathe on her own and that her brain was functioning. However, one source said that Gda Casserly, due to marry in the summer, was “not in a good way” and that doctors remain concerned. The crash, which happened at 12.30am last Monday on the Galway to Limerick road, claimed the life of Liam McDonnell. The 66-year-old from Cleaghmore, Ballinasloe, was a resident at the Little Flower Nursing

    Irish Examiner q
  • With ‘broken hearts’ Westport House goes up for sale

    The historic 18th century Westport House in Co Mayo has been put up for sale by the Browne family, who have owned the estate for nearly 400 years. It was with huge regret the family admitted that the tourist attraction, built on the site of one of Mayo pirate queen Grace O’Malley’s castles, is to be sold off along with the 183 hectare estate, which is a going tourist concern with a debt of €1m. The house and grounds have been open to the public since 1960 and in recent years, Sheelyn and Karen Browne, eldest daughters of the last owner, Jeremy Browne, the Marquess of Sligo lord Altamont, have expanded the amenities at Westport House to include an adventure activity centre as well as weddings, functions and seasonal events in a bid to run their ancestral home as a viable tourist business.

    Irish Examiner q
  • Heard the one about EU law and Irish minimum alcohol prices?

    Last December, a certain grey-haired gentleman clothed in red and resident in a magical-seeming faraway land dropped a gift - carefully crafted by himself and his little band of helpers - down the chimney of Minister for Health Leo Varadkar. Too bad for Leo Varadkar that the grey-haired gentleman on this occasion happened to be the Cypriot Judge Constantinos Lycourgos - and his helpers the Second Chamber of the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. Their Christmas offering - doubtless about as welcome to the Minister as a lump of coal in his Christmas stocking - was the December 23rd ruling Scotch Whisky Association v Lord Advocate that legislation on the lines of Scotland’s draft minimum unit pricing for alcohol is illegal under EU law. Ireland’s own Public Health (Alcohol) Bill 2015, approved by the Government as late as December 8th, proposed pretty much the same approach as the Scots deployed for combating excessive alcohol consumption.

    The Irish Times q
  • Sonia O’Sullivan may be awarded medals after Chinese drug revelations

    They say the truth always come out in the end, and perhaps the only surprise about the cold truth now emerging about the notoriously dominant Chinese women’s distance runners of the early 1990s is that it took so long. Not too long for Sonia O’Sullivan, perhaps, who may be in line for a much-belated World Championship gold medal – possibly even two – after being originally run out of the gold medal positions by those Chinese runners over both 3,000m and 1,500m at the 1993 World Athletics Championships in Stuttgart. Better known as “Ma’s Army”, given they all trained under the deeply regimental coach Ma Junren, they first came to prominence at those 1993 Championships in Stuttgart: O’Sullivan

    The Irish Times q
  • Saoirse Ronan teaches America how to make the perfect cuppa tea

    Saoirse Ronan is doing her country proud as she brings Irish culture to America. The Oscar nominated actress took part in Vanity Fair’s Secret Talent Theatre series where stars show off some of their lesser known skills. The 21-year-old took the opportunity to teach international viewers the correct way to brew the perfect cup of Irish tea and we think she did a great job. While her cuppa was brewing, Saoirse also took the time to explain to viewers why our fair nation is “the centre of the universe”. “Ireland’s the best. It’s a small island between the  UK and America, the center of the universe basically,” she said. It comes just after legendary screen actress Helen Mirren revealed that she

    Irish Examiner q
  • Michael Noonan: I knew about south east abuse allegations 20 years ago

    Finance Minister Michael Noonan knew about abuse allegations at a foster home in the southeast area as far back as 20 years ago, he has revealed. Today, Mr Noonan confirmed that he received a letter written by the foster father in the controversy directly to himself in 1996, when he was Health Minister. The Government moved to establish a Commission of Inquiry on foot of reports in the abuse scandal in the Irish Examiner in recent weeks. Two nights ago, Independent TD Clare Daly told the Dáil that allegations had been brought to Mr Noonan’s attention at that time, and called on him to clarify his actions. Central to the scandal is the alleged rape, abuse and neglect of an intellectually disabled

    Irish Examiner q
  • Simon Coveney’s brother questions how so many people were 'left behind'

    Agriculture Minister Simon Coveney’s businessman brother has publicly questioned how so many people have been “left behind” in what he described as the “unprecedented economic recovery” of recent years. While hailing the achievements of the Government in turning around the economy, Greencore CEO Patrick Coveney said the “great mystery” of the recovery is that “no-one feels it”. At a business conference in Cork, Mr Coveney questioned the success of the Government in ensuring the benefits of the economic recovery were evenly felt across all sectors of society. Mr Coveney described the revival in the country’s economic fortunes as “unprecedented”. But he said the rising tide hasn’t lifted everyone

    Irish Examiner q
  • Former Friends star to host new Top Gear

    Former star of the Friends TV show Matt LeBlanc has been announced by the BBC as one of Chris Evans’ co-hosts for the new series of Top Gear, which will tho the airwaves in May of this year. It’s a welcome shot of good news for what is increasingly looking like a troubled production. The build up to the first series of Top Gear not to feature the infamous Jeremy Clarkson since 2002 has been bedevilled with apparent problems including the departure of a key series producer (Lisa Clark, whose departure was considered a major blow for the show) and tales of rows between Evans and senior BBC executives over the tone and content of the new series. LeBlanc is best known to most of us as the gormless

    The Irish Times q
  • Meet the Irishman working on some of the world’s biggest war crime cases

    I have been living away from Ireland now for 12 of the last 14 years. To paraphrase Dickens, it has been the best of times and the worst of times. I am currently working as a defence lawyer at the Khmer Rouge Court in Phnom Penh in Cambodia, but since leaving home I have lived in New Zealand, Bosnia, and the UK, working as a prosecution lawyer on war crimes, organised crimes and terrorism cases. The crimes have ranged from the biggest massacre during the war in Kosovo and the Srebrenica genocide, to the first successful prosecution of doctors for organ trafficking, and the smuggling of migrants and drugs. My journey began with a trip through South America and the Pacific, ending in New Zealand

    The Irish Times q
  • Garda injured in Galway crash seriously ill in hospital

    One of two gardaí injured in a road incident which claimed the life of a 66-year-old man in south Galway is still seriously ill in hospital. Garda Sharon Casserly was being treated for broken limbs in University Hospital Galway this week when her condition deteriorated. Ms Casserly and Garda Peter Murtagh from Gort Garda station were hit after they had stopped their patrol car on the N18 at 12.30am on Monday to assist Mr Liam McDonnell (66). Mr McDonnell had earlier been reported missing from a nursing home in Labane near the village of Ardrahan. All three were struck by a car travelling around a sweeping bend about 2km north of Ardrahan. Mr McDonnell was pronounced dead at the scene. A man in

    The Irish Times q
  • Mary Lou McDonald stays silent on support for Thomas ‘Slab’ Murphy

    Sinn Féin deputy leader Mary Lou McDonald has declined to repeat the claim that Thomas ‘Slab’ Murphy is a good republican after a BBC Spotlight programme raised fresh concerns over his history. She refused to restate the phrase at the launch of her party’s latest call for the Moore Street 1916 site to be saved by the next government. Asked about the BBC programme’s allegation that Mr Murphy is a “mass murderer” who “sent those people out to commit murder on behalf of the provisional IRA”, Ms McDonald repeatedly said he, like every other citizen, is accountable to the law. However, she declined to repeat her party leader Gerry Adams’ previous claim that Mr Murphy is a “good republican”, instead

    Irish Examiner q
  • GAA club fined €2,000 for allowing Jamie Carragher soccer school on premises

    Dromard GAA club in Longford has been fined €2,000 for allowing a soccer school to take place on its premises last summer. The penalty was handed down by the GAA’s Central Hearings Committee (CHC) earlier this week. The Jamie Carragher Soccer School, which has been running since the former Liverpool player’s retirement three years ago, was held in Dromard last August. The event was held by the GAA’s Central Hearings Committee to have contravened Rule 5.1 (a) of the Official Guide, governing the uses of association property.

    The Irish Times q
  • The five-second rule is legit, according to science

    It turns out you’re right to live by the five-second rule, eating everything and anything moments after it lands on the floor. If anything, you have even longer. A new video for a Discovery Science show called The Quick and the Curious – hosted by former NASA engineer Mark Rober – goes into detail, with passersby encouraged to eat a cookie that’s just landed on the ground. The segment, which is presented by NASA’s Mike Meacham, is as basic as it is fun. It turns out that, far from five seconds being the cut-off point (often followed by blessing your crumbling biscuit), you’re actually golden for half a minute. Well, half a minute depending on the environment. And, surprisingly, dropping food

    Silicon Republic q
  • Two teenagers and three men arrested after burglaries

    Two teenagers and three young adults were arrested on Thursday following an investigation into a number of recent burglaries. Gardaí carried out searches on properties in Co Kilkenny and Co Waterford and Portlaoise on Thursday morning. A teenage girl was one of the group arrested and is being kept in custody in Kilkenny Garda station. Three men, aged 21, 28, 30, and one teenage boy, are in custody at various Garda stations in the areas. A Garda spokesman said property and items, believed to be stolen, were recovered during the searches.

    The Irish Times q
  • Care model could reduce diabetes amputations by a third

    A new model of care for the management of type-2 diabetes by GPs and practise nurses will reduce amputations by a third. The author of the new guidelines launched yesterday, Dr Velma Harkins, said proper diabetes management and foot care helped to prevent complications that could result in amputation. Dr Harkins said in the past, the care of diabetes was unstructured and sometimes delivered in an opportunistic manner. She said there had been an “explosion” in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, predominantly type 2. It was forecast to increase by 62% between 2007 and 2020. “If these guidelines from the Irish College of General Practitioners are followed, amputations will be reduced by a third,”

    Irish Examiner q
  • Ireland remains fastest-growing economy in Europe

    Ireland has retained its status as the European Union’s fastest-growing economy, according to European Commission forecasts published this morning. The Commission’s triannual analysis of the EU’s 28 economies predicts that Irish gdp (gross domestic product) will grow by 4.5 per cent this year, before slowing to 3.5 per cent in 2017. Following growth of 6.9 per cent in 2015, Ireland continues to be the fastest-growing economy in Europe. The projected growth rate of 4.5 per cent in 2016 leaves Ireland just ahead of Malta and Luxembourg in terms of gdp growth, with 1.8 per cent growth forecast in the euro zone’s largest economy, Germany, 1.3 per cent for France, and 2.1 per cent in Britain. Ireland

    The Irish Times q
  • Sir Van Morrison 'exhilarated' over his knighthood

    Sir Van Morrison described himself as just a “blue-eyed soul singer” from Belfast as he was knighted for a musical career that has enthralled audiences and delighted critics. Over more than 50 years the singer has gone from teenage stardom to innovator and is now a respected veteran, whose classic album Astral Weeks regularly makes the list of top 100 albums of all time. The artist, whose full name is George Ivan Morrison, was introduced as Sir Ivan Morrison as he stepped forward to be dubbed a knight by the Prince of Wales in Buckingham Palace’s ballroom. Afterwards he said about becoming a Sir: “It’s amazing, it’s very exhilarating, the whole thing. “For 53 years I’ve been in the business –

    Irish Examiner q
  • Child dies from swine flu in Dublin hospital

    A child has died in a Dublin hospital from the H1N1 strain of influenza which was responsible for the 2009 swine flu outbreak. In a statement on Thursday night, the HSE said the child died last week having contracted the flu virus H1N1. The child is understood to have been from the west of Ireland but had been transferred to Dublin for treatment. The HSE said flu rates continued to rise and were expected to do so for more than or two more weeks. “Those who have not got a vaccine at this stage are encouraged to do so as the vaccine covers the virus that is around at the moment,” it said. “If you get the symptoms of flu you should stay at home look after yourself and get in touch with a GP if you

    The Irish Times q
  • Syria conflict: Rebels lose grip as Russian jets pound Aleppo

    Opposition forces in northern Syria say they are losing their grip on Aleppo as Russian bombardment and advances by pro-Assad militias come close to cutting their supply lines and besieging the city. After a week of the most intensive bombardment of the five-year war, forces loyal to the Syrian leader are in control of most of the countryside immediately to the north. Russian jets have pounded the area throughout the past week, as Syrian factions have gathered in Geneva for a faltering peace summit. The attacks have succeeded in clearing rebel strongholds that had defied two earlier regime pushes, and allowed loyalist forces led by Lebanese Hizbullah and Shia militias to advance towards a large industrial area at the gateway to the rebel-held east that has been transformed into a wasteland over three years of bombardment.

    The Irish Times q